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What are Piaget's four stages of intellectual development?

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Dr. Jean Piaget's four stages of intellectual (or cognitive) development are:

Piaget acknowledged that some children may pass through the stages at different ages than the averages noted above and that some children may show characteristics of more than one stage at a given time. However, he also insisted that cognitive development always follows this sequence, that stages cannot be skipped, and that each stage is marked by new intellectual abilities and a more complex understanding of the world.

  • Sensorimotor. Birth through ages 18-24 months
  • Preoperational. Toddlerhood (18-24 months) through early childhood (age 7)
  • Concrete operational. Ages 7 to 12
  • Formal operational. Adolescence through adulthood

From: Piaget Stages of Development WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES: Wood, K. "Piaget's Stages of Cognitive Development," in M. Orey   , 2001. PBS.org: "Piaget describes stages of cognitive development 1923-1952." Huitt, W. "Piaget's Theory of Cognitive Development. Educational Psychology Interactive," 2003.


Emerging perspectives on learning, teaching, and technology

Reviewed by Amita Shroff on October 26, 2017

SOURCES: Wood, K. "Piaget's Stages of Cognitive Development," in M. Orey   , 2001. PBS.org: "Piaget describes stages of cognitive development 1923-1952." Huitt, W. "Piaget's Theory of Cognitive Development. Educational Psychology Interactive," 2003.


Emerging perspectives on learning, teaching, and technology

Reviewed by Amita Shroff on October 26, 2017

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What is the sensorimotor stage in Piaget's stages of development?

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