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What are the treatments for a cold in babies?

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Colds don't need to be treated. They usually go away on their own after a few days. Antibiotics won't work because they kill bacteria, and in this case, viruses are to blame.

You’ll naturally want to calm your baby's symptoms. But don't give over-the-counter cough and cold medicines to infants and toddlers. They can cause dangerous side effects in young children.

To bring down a fever and make your child more comfortable, you can use acetaminophen (Children's Tylenol) or ibuprofen (Children's Motrin or Advil) if she's over 6 months old.

From: When Your Baby Has a Cold WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

American Academy of Pediatrics: "Children and Colds," "Water & Juice."

FDA: "An Important FDA Reminder for Parents: Do Not Give Infants Cough and Cold Products Designed for Older Children," "Have a Baby or Young Child With a Cold? Most Don't Need Medicines."

Nemours Foundation: "Common Cold."

Paediatrics & Child Health: "Colds in Children."

Stanford Children's Health: "Upper Respiratory Infection (URI or Common Cold)."

Reviewed by Dan Brennan on May 08, 2018

SOURCES:

American Academy of Pediatrics: "Children and Colds," "Water & Juice."

FDA: "An Important FDA Reminder for Parents: Do Not Give Infants Cough and Cold Products Designed for Older Children," "Have a Baby or Young Child With a Cold? Most Don't Need Medicines."

Nemours Foundation: "Common Cold."

Paediatrics & Child Health: "Colds in Children."

Stanford Children's Health: "Upper Respiratory Infection (URI or Common Cold)."

Reviewed by Dan Brennan on May 08, 2018

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What are some home remedies for colds in babies?

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