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What causes a baby to have a cold?

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Babies get so many colds because their immune system isn't yet ready to fight off the 100 or so viruses that cause these infections. The cold virus spreads through the air when someone who's sick coughs or sneezes. It also lands on surfaces such as toys and tables. When babies touch these surfaces and then put their hands in their mouths -- which they do a lot -- they give the cold virus an easy entry route.

Babies often pick up colds at day care. Or they can catch it from older brothers and sisters who bring the virus home from school -- or from grown-ups who shook hands with someone who should have stayed home from work.

From: When Your Baby Has a Cold WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

American Academy of Pediatrics: "Children and Colds," "Water & Juice."

FDA: "An Important FDA Reminder for Parents: Do Not Give Infants Cough and Cold Products Designed for Older Children," "Have a Baby or Young Child With a Cold? Most Don't Need Medicines."

Nemours Foundation: "Common Cold."

Paediatrics & Child Health: "Colds in Children."

Stanford Children's Health: "Upper Respiratory Infection (URI or Common Cold)."

Reviewed by Dan Brennan on May 08, 2018

SOURCES:

American Academy of Pediatrics: "Children and Colds," "Water & Juice."

FDA: "An Important FDA Reminder for Parents: Do Not Give Infants Cough and Cold Products Designed for Older Children," "Have a Baby or Young Child With a Cold? Most Don't Need Medicines."

Nemours Foundation: "Common Cold."

Paediatrics & Child Health: "Colds in Children."

Stanford Children's Health: "Upper Respiratory Infection (URI or Common Cold)."

Reviewed by Dan Brennan on May 08, 2018

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What are the symptoms of a cold in babies?

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