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What causes cystic fibrosis?

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It’s not contagious. It’s caused by a mutation (change) in a single gene called the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR.) This controls the flow of salt and fluids in and out of your cells. If the CFTR gene doesn’t work like it should, a sticky mucus builds up throughout your body. To get cystic fibrosis (CF), you have to inherit a mutated copy of the gene from both your parents. If you only inherit one, you won’t have any symptoms. But you’ll be a “carrier” of the disease. That means there’s a chance you could pass it on to your own child one day. About 10 million Americans are CF carriers. Every time two CF carriers have a baby, there’s a 25% (1 in 4) chance that their baby will be born with CF.

From: Cystic Fibrosis WebMD Medical Reference

Reviewed by Paul Boyce on September 17, 2019

Medically Reviewed on 9/17/2019

SOURCES:

Cystic Fibrosis Foundation: “About Cystic Fibrosis,” “CF Genetics: The Basics.”

American Lung Foundation: “Learn about Cystic Fibrosis,” “Cystic Fibrosis,” “Fertility in Women with CF.”

National Human Genome Research Institute: “Learning about Cystic Fibrosis.”

Mayo Clinic: “Cystic Fibrosis.”

YourGenome.org: “What is cystic fibrosis?”

National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences/Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center: “Cystic fibrosis.”

The Childhood Liver Disease Research Network: “Cystic Fibrosis Liver Disease.”

Johns Hopkins Cystic Fibrosis Center: “Effects of CF: Pancreas/Gastrointestinal Tract: Intestinal Problems,” “Effects of CF: Muscle/Bone,” “Effects of CF: Reproduction,” “Effects of CF: Bladder/Kidney.”

Reviewed by Paul Boyce on September 17, 2019

SOURCES:

Cystic Fibrosis Foundation: “About Cystic Fibrosis,” “CF Genetics: The Basics.”

American Lung Foundation: “Learn about Cystic Fibrosis,” “Cystic Fibrosis,” “Fertility in Women with CF.”

National Human Genome Research Institute: “Learning about Cystic Fibrosis.”

Mayo Clinic: “Cystic Fibrosis.”

YourGenome.org: “What is cystic fibrosis?”

National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences/Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center: “Cystic fibrosis.”

The Childhood Liver Disease Research Network: “Cystic Fibrosis Liver Disease.”

Johns Hopkins Cystic Fibrosis Center: “Effects of CF: Pancreas/Gastrointestinal Tract: Intestinal Problems,” “Effects of CF: Muscle/Bone,” “Effects of CF: Reproduction,” “Effects of CF: Bladder/Kidney.”

Reviewed by Paul Boyce on September 17, 2019

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Which parts of the body does cystic fibrosis affect?

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