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What causes tongue-tie in babies?

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Usually, the lingual frenulum separates from the tongue before your baby is born. But sometimes it doesn’t. Doctors aren’t sure why. It may run in families. We do know that boys are 3 times more likely to get it than girls.

From: What Is Tongue-Tie in Babies? WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

Mayo Clinic: “Tongue-Tie (Ankyloglossia).”

Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia: “Ankyloglossia (Tongue-Tie).”

National Health Service: “Tongue-Tie.”

Victoria State Government, Better Health Channel: “Tongue-Tie.”

Reviewed by Roy Benaroch on January 10, 2018

SOURCES:

Mayo Clinic: “Tongue-Tie (Ankyloglossia).”

Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia: “Ankyloglossia (Tongue-Tie).”

National Health Service: “Tongue-Tie.”

Victoria State Government, Better Health Channel: “Tongue-Tie.”

Reviewed by Roy Benaroch on January 10, 2018

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What are the symptoms of tongue-tie in babies?

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