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What do pain in young children and teenagers mean?

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Pain is a common complaint with young children and teenagers. Don’t ignore constant pain. Even if you don’t find a physical cause, something is still wrong.

If your child has sudden pain in the belly, it could be a viral infection or something serious like an appendicitis.

Constant stomachaches and headaches could result from constipation, migraines, viral infections, menstrual periods, or other causes. Body pain that won’t go away, usually along with trouble falling or staying asleep, could mean your child is depressed or anxious.

Chest pain that comes and goes could be a sign of muscle strain from new sport or from emotional stress. Chest pain following an injury could indicate a broken rib or collapsed lung. Chest pain that won’t go away could mean asthma or an infection, such as pneumonia.

From: Symptoms of Pain in Children WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES: 

Schiff, D. and Shelov, S. Villard Books, 1997.  AmericanAcademyof PediatricsGuide to Your Child's Symptoms,

Zeltzer, LK. HarperCollins, 2005.  Conquering Your Child's Chronic Pain,

National Pain Foundation: "Pediatric Pain: Psychological Factors Related to Chronic Pain in Children and Adolescents." 

Lonnie K. Zeltzer, MD, director, Pediatric Pain Program, UCLA Mattel Children's Hospital, Los Angeles.

Reviewed by Dan Brennan on July 19, 2019

SOURCES: 

Schiff, D. and Shelov, S. Villard Books, 1997.  AmericanAcademyof PediatricsGuide to Your Child's Symptoms,

Zeltzer, LK. HarperCollins, 2005.  Conquering Your Child's Chronic Pain,

National Pain Foundation: "Pediatric Pain: Psychological Factors Related to Chronic Pain in Children and Adolescents." 

Lonnie K. Zeltzer, MD, director, Pediatric Pain Program, UCLA Mattel Children's Hospital, Los Angeles.

Reviewed by Dan Brennan on July 19, 2019

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