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What does it mean if a child snores loudly?

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Slightly more than one out of every 10 children snore habitually. It can be caused by different problems. For example, chronic nasal congestion, enlarged adenoids, or huge tonsils that block the airway can all cause snoring.

Snoring can be harmless. But it can also result in poor quality of sleep and changes in the child's sleep-wake cycle. He won't be as alert during the day because of restless sleep and waking up a lot at night. That can lead to dramatic changes in mood and energy. A few children who snore may have a more serious problem called obstructive sleep apnea, or OSA.

From: Sleep Disorders in Children WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES: American Family Physician: "Sleep Problems and Sleep Disorders in Children." University of Michigan Health System: "Sleep Problems." National Sleep Foundation: "Coping with Children’s Sleep Problems." National Sleep Foundation: "Children, Obesity and Sleep."



Reviewed by Amita Shroff on February 20, 2019

SOURCES: American Family Physician: "Sleep Problems and Sleep Disorders in Children." University of Michigan Health System: "Sleep Problems." National Sleep Foundation: "Coping with Children’s Sleep Problems." National Sleep Foundation: "Children, Obesity and Sleep."



Reviewed by Amita Shroff on February 20, 2019

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What issues is sleep apnea associated with?

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