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What imaging tests are used to diagnose urinary tract infections (UTIs) in kids?

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If your child has had a few UTIs, your doctor might do one or more of these imaging tests to look for problems in the urinary tract:

  • Ultrasound uses sound waves to show any blockages or other problems in the kidneys
  • Voiding cystourethrogram (VCUG) places fluid into the bladder through a tube to show any problems in the urethra or bladder when your child pees
  • Nuclear scan uses liquids that contain a small amount of radioactive material to see how well the kidneys work
  • CT, or computed tomography, is a powerful X-ray that makes detailed pictures of the bladder and kidneys
  • MRI, or magnetic resonance imaging, uses powerful magnets and radio waves to make pictures of the bladder and kidneys

From: If Your Child Gets a UTI WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases: "Urinary Tract Infections (UTIs) In Children."

Nemours Foundation: "Urinary Tract Infections."

Urology Care Foundation: "After Treatment," "How are UTIs Diagnosed in Children?" "How Are UTIs Treated in Children?" "What Are the Signs of UTIs in Children?" "What Causes UTIs in Children?" "What is a Urinary Tract Infection (UTI) in Children?"

Reviewed by Amita Shroff on February 20, 2019

SOURCES:

National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases: "Urinary Tract Infections (UTIs) In Children."

Nemours Foundation: "Urinary Tract Infections."

Urology Care Foundation: "After Treatment," "How are UTIs Diagnosed in Children?" "How Are UTIs Treated in Children?" "What Are the Signs of UTIs in Children?" "What Causes UTIs in Children?" "What is a Urinary Tract Infection (UTI) in Children?"

Reviewed by Amita Shroff on February 20, 2019

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How are urinary tract infections (UTIs) in kids treated?

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