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What is Bisphenol A (BPA)?

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BPA is a chemical that has been used to harden plastics for more than 40 years. It's in medical devices, compact discs, dental sealants, water bottles, the lining of canned foods and drinks, and many other products.

More than 90% of us have BPA in our bodies right now. We get most of it by eating foods that have been in containers made with BPA. It's also possible to pick up BPA through air, dust, and water.

From: The Facts About Bisphenol A WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

Harvey Karp, MD, pediatrician, author of and assistant professor of pediatrics, UCLA School of Medicine. The Happiest Baby on the BlockThe Happiest Toddler on the Block;

American Nurses Association.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Environmental Working Group.

Food and Drug Administration.

George Mason University's Statistical Assessment Service (STATS.)

Healthy Child Healthy World.

National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences.

Ryan, B. , March 2010. Toxicological Sciences

Sharpe, R. , March 2010. Toxicological Sciences

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

 

Reviewed by Dan Brennan on December 05, 2017

SOURCES:

Harvey Karp, MD, pediatrician, author of and assistant professor of pediatrics, UCLA School of Medicine. The Happiest Baby on the BlockThe Happiest Toddler on the Block;

American Nurses Association.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Environmental Working Group.

Food and Drug Administration.

George Mason University's Statistical Assessment Service (STATS.)

Healthy Child Healthy World.

National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences.

Ryan, B. , March 2010. Toxicological Sciences

Sharpe, R. , March 2010. Toxicological Sciences

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

 

Reviewed by Dan Brennan on December 05, 2017

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What are the risks of Bisphenol A (BPA)?

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