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What is the sensorimotor stage in Piaget's stages of development?

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During the early stages, infants are only aware of what is immediately in front of them. They focus on what they see, what they are doing, and physical interactions with their immediate environment.  

Because they don't yet know how things react, they're constantly experimenting with activities such as shaking or throwing things, putting things in their mouths, and learning about the world through trial and error. The later stages include goal-oriented behavior which brings about a desired result.

Between the ages of 7 and 9 months, infants begin to realize that an object exists even if it can no longer be seen. This important milestone -- known as object permanence -- is a sign that memory is developing.  

After infants start crawling, standing, and walking, their increased physical mobility leads to increased cognitive development. Near the end of the sensorimotor stage (18-24 months), infants reach another important milestone -- early language development, a sign that they are developing some symbolic abilities.

SOURCES:
Wood, K. "Piaget's Stages of Cognitive Development," in M. Orey  Emerging perspectives on learning, teaching, and technology, 2001.
PBS.org: "Piaget describes stages of cognitive development 1923-1952."
Huitt, W. "Piaget's Theory of Cognitive Development. Educational Psychology Interactive," 2003.

Reviewed by Hansa D. Bhargava on August 17, 2020

SOURCES:
Wood, K. "Piaget's Stages of Cognitive Development," in M. Orey  Emerging perspectives on learning, teaching, and technology, 2001.
PBS.org: "Piaget describes stages of cognitive development 1923-1952."
Huitt, W. "Piaget's Theory of Cognitive Development. Educational Psychology Interactive," 2003.

Reviewed by Hansa D. Bhargava on August 17, 2020

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What is the concrete operational stage in Piaget's stages of development?

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