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What vaccines are used to treat meningococcal meningitis?

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In the U.S., doctors use three types of meningococcal vaccines:

  • Meningococcal conjugate vaccine (MCV4) -- One of these vaccines, Menactra, is approved for people ages 9 months to 55. The other, Menveo, is used in those ages 2 through 55.
  • Meningococcal polysaccharide vaccine (MPSV4) -- This vaccine used is for people as young as 9 months and older than age 55.
  • Serogroup B Meningococcal B - There are two MenB vaccines. Trumenba (MenB-FHbp) and Bexsero (MenB-4C). Both are licensed for ages 10 to 24, but can be used in older people, too.

From: An Overview of Meningococcal Meningitis WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

Advisory Committee for Immunization Practices (ACIP).  Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: ''Meningococcal Disease: Help Prevent It.'' MedlinePlus: "Meningitis - meningococcal." CDC: "Meningococcal Vaccines: What You Need to Know." Nemours Foundation: "Meningitis." Meningitis Research Foundation: "Symptoms." National Network for Immunization Information: "Vaccine Information: Meningococcal Disease."





Reviewed by Dan Brennan on October 05, 2019

SOURCES:

Advisory Committee for Immunization Practices (ACIP).  Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: ''Meningococcal Disease: Help Prevent It.'' MedlinePlus: "Meningitis - meningococcal." CDC: "Meningococcal Vaccines: What You Need to Know." Nemours Foundation: "Meningitis." Meningitis Research Foundation: "Symptoms." National Network for Immunization Information: "Vaccine Information: Meningococcal Disease."





Reviewed by Dan Brennan on October 05, 2019

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When should someone get the meningococcal meningitis vaccine?

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