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When should you call 911 about your child's cough?

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Call 911 if your child:

  • Is struggling for breath, can't talk, or grunts with each breath
  • Is choking and unable to stop
  • Has passed out or stopped breathing
  • Has blue-tinged lips or fingernails

SOURCES:

American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology: "Cough in Children: Tips to Remember."

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: "Cold and Cough Medicines: Information for Parents."

Children's Hospital Colorado: "Your Child's Cough;" "Flu Facts;" "Whooping Cough (Pertussis);" "Asthma Basics;" "Asthma and Allergy Awareness – Information You Can Use."

American College of Chest Physicians: "Overview of Common Causes of Chronic Cough."

KidsHealth.org: "Infections: Common Cold."

American Academy of Pediatrics: "Croup Treatment."

Seattle Children's Hospital: "Should You See a Doctor? Cough."

Lucile Packard Foundation for Children’s Health | Stanford University School of Medicine: "Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD) / Heartburn" and "Acute Bronchitis."

National Institutes of Health: "Cold and Cough Medicines."

Reviewed by Renee A. Alli on April 17, 2018

SOURCES:

American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology: "Cough in Children: Tips to Remember."

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: "Cold and Cough Medicines: Information for Parents."

Children's Hospital Colorado: "Your Child's Cough;" "Flu Facts;" "Whooping Cough (Pertussis);" "Asthma Basics;" "Asthma and Allergy Awareness – Information You Can Use."

American College of Chest Physicians: "Overview of Common Causes of Chronic Cough."

KidsHealth.org: "Infections: Common Cold."

American Academy of Pediatrics: "Croup Treatment."

Seattle Children's Hospital: "Should You See a Doctor? Cough."

Lucile Packard Foundation for Children’s Health | Stanford University School of Medicine: "Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD) / Heartburn" and "Acute Bronchitis."

National Institutes of Health: "Cold and Cough Medicines."

Reviewed by Renee A. Alli on April 17, 2018

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When should you call your doctor about your child's cough?

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THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

    This tool does not provide medical advice. See additional information.