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When should you call your doctor about your child's cough?

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Call your doctor right away if your child:

  • Has trouble breathing
  • Persistent vomiting
  • Turns red or purple when coughing
  • Drools or has trouble swallowing
  • Seems very sick or fatigued
  • May have an object caught in their throat
  • Has chest pain when breathing deep
  • Is coughing blood or wheezing
  • Has a weak immune system or is not fully immunized
  • Is younger than age 4 months with a rectal temperature above 100.4° F (Do not give fever medicine to infants.)
  • Has a fever over 104 F, with no improvement in two hours after fever medicine

SOURCES:

American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology: "Cough in Children: Tips to Remember."

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: "Cold and Cough Medicines: Information for Parents."

Children's Hospital Colorado: "Your Child's Cough;" "Flu Facts;" "Whooping Cough (Pertussis);" "Asthma Basics;" "Asthma and Allergy Awareness – Information You Can Use."

American College of Chest Physicians: "Overview of Common Causes of Chronic Cough."

KidsHealth.org: "Infections: Common Cold."

American Academy of Pediatrics: "Croup Treatment."

Seattle Children's Hospital: "Should You See a Doctor? Cough."

Lucile Packard Foundation for Children’s Health | Stanford University School of Medicine: "Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD) / Heartburn" and "Acute Bronchitis."

National Institutes of Health: "Cold and Cough Medicines."

Reviewed by Renee A. Alli on April 17, 2018

SOURCES:

American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology: "Cough in Children: Tips to Remember."

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: "Cold and Cough Medicines: Information for Parents."

Children's Hospital Colorado: "Your Child's Cough;" "Flu Facts;" "Whooping Cough (Pertussis);" "Asthma Basics;" "Asthma and Allergy Awareness – Information You Can Use."

American College of Chest Physicians: "Overview of Common Causes of Chronic Cough."

KidsHealth.org: "Infections: Common Cold."

American Academy of Pediatrics: "Croup Treatment."

Seattle Children's Hospital: "Should You See a Doctor? Cough."

Lucile Packard Foundation for Children’s Health | Stanford University School of Medicine: "Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD) / Heartburn" and "Acute Bronchitis."

National Institutes of Health: "Cold and Cough Medicines."

Reviewed by Renee A. Alli on April 17, 2018

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