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  • Answer 1/12

    Your child should first go to the dentist when: 

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    Tooth decay can start earlier than you might expect, and research shows that children who wait to see a dentist until age 2 or 3 are more likely to end up needing treatments. The American Academy of Dentistry recommends that all children have a checkup once their first tooth comes in or they celebrate their first birthday, whichever comes first.

  • Answer 1/12

    Breastfed babies should be given:

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    Breast milk is rich in nutrients that help keep your baby healthy, but one thing it may not have enough of is vitamin D. It helps the body absorb calcium. That's why the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends giving your baby a vitamin D supplement of 400 IU per day until he switches to fortified formula or milk. You can buy the supplement in liquid form and give it to your baby in drops.

  • Question 1/12

    As soon as your toddler's temperature goes above 101 F, you should give him medication to lower it.

  • Answer 1/12

    As soon as your toddler's temperature goes above 101 F, you should give him medication to lower it.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Low-grade fevers are common in little ones. They're a sign that the body is battling a germy invader. So unless your child seems really uncomfortable, you're better off skipping the medication. If the temperature rises above 102 F, it may be time to reach for the meds. 

     

    A lukewarm -- not cold -- bath can help get a fever down. Make sure you give your child acetaminophen first, otherwise his body might start shivering in an attempt to get his temperature back up.

  • Answer 1/12

    Your kids might get head lice if:

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    Lice are parasites, and they usually travel via direct head-to-head contact. Rolling around with buddies at the playground, sleeping in close quarters at slumber party, or hugging a friend or sibling give these nasty bugs prime opportunities to climb from one head to the next. 

     

    If your child has them, don't try to use a hair dryer to kill lice or their eggs; you'd have to crank the heat so high that you'd burn your kid's scalp. Home remedies like rinsing with vinegar or slathering on mayonnaise might kill existing lice, but they won't kill eggs, which will soon hatch. Ask your child's pediatrician to recommend an FDA-approved treatment. Some formulas require a prescription, while others are available over the counter.

  • Question 1/12

    It's usually safe to start giving kids cough and cold medicine starting at:

  • Answer 1/12

    It's usually safe to start giving kids cough and cold medicine starting at:

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    • Correct Answer:

    It can be hard to watch your child cough, sneeze, and feel miserable, but you generally shouldn't give drugstore cold medicine to a child younger than 4, and you should nevergive it to kids under age 2. There's no good evidence that cough suppressants and decongestants work at such a young age, and the risks are real: The FDA warns that these meds have caused convulsions, rapid heart rate, and even death in some young children. A humidifier can help clear up congestion.

  • Answer 1/12

    Growing pains are caused by:

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    • Correct Answer:

    Despite the name, growing pains have nothing to do with getting taller or putting on weight. The physical process of growing bigger happens too slowly to be painful. But that doesn't mean your child is fibbing when he complains about aches in his calves, thighs, legs, or behind his knees, as about 25% to 40% of kids do. 

     

    One theory is that kids don't feel tired or sore when they're running around having fun, so they may overdo it and get achy later when their muscles have had a chance to relax. 

     

    Taking breaks during sports, enjoying a warm bath before bed, and age-appropriate, over-the-counter pain relievers can help. But if the pain is severe or accompanied by a fever or dark urine, get help right away as something more serious could be going on. Redness, warmth, or a lump in a muscle are also things to tell the doctor about.

  • Question 1/12

    Which pain and fever medications are safe for most infants and children?

  • Answer 1/12

    Which pain and fever medications are safe for most infants and children?

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    • Correct Answer:

    It's usually OK to give a child acetaminophen (Children's or Infants' Tylenol) after 2 months of age. Once your child is 6 months old, ibuprofen (Children's Advil or Motrin) is another option. Always follow the instructions on the medication carefully. And never give kids aspirin. It's been linked to a rare but serious condition called Reye's syndrome.

  • Question 1/12

    How much physical activity does your child need each day?

  • Answer 1/12

    How much physical activity does your child need each day?

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    • Correct Answer:

    You don't need to get a gym membership for your 8-year-old. But you do want to make sure that your child -- no matter his age -- gets plenty of exercise. Aim for a mix of strong aerobic activity (such as biking or an intense game of tag), muscle-strengthening work (think gymnastics or hanging from the monkey bars), and bone-strengthening activity (like jumping rope or running.)

  • Answer 1/12

    Who should get the HPV vaccine?

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    • Correct Answer:

    HPV, or human papillomavirus, may be best known for causing cervical cancer, but this common virus can also lead to cancers of the anus, penis, and throat, as well as genital warts. That's why CDC guidelines recommend that both boys and girls get vaccinated. 

     

    Although the shots can be given as late as age 26, earlier is better: HPV is a sexually transmitted virus, and the vaccine is most effective when given before someone has started having sex.

  • Question 1/12

    How many hours of sleep do most 15-year-olds need per night?

  • Answer 1/12

    How many hours of sleep do most 15-year-olds need per night?

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    • Correct Answer:

    Your teen might prefer to text or play video games into the wee hours, but logging some serious shut-eye is more important. Between ages 14-17, most kids need 8-10 hours a night for health and well-being.

  • Question 1/12

    When riding in a car, most 7- and 8-year-olds should:

  • Answer 1/12

    When riding in a car, most 7- and 8-year-olds should:

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Seat belts save lives, but only when they fit properly. The American Academy of Pediatrics says children who have outgrown car seats should use belt-positioning booster seats until they're tall enough for a seat belt to fit them correctly. That usually happens between the ages of 8 and 12, when a child is at least 4 feet 9 inches tall. 

     

    With or without a booster, the right position for a lap belt is low and snug across the thighs; the shoulder belt should cross the middle of your child's chest and shoulder and notbe on his neck.

  • Question 1/12

    If your child has a really bad cold, he needs an antibiotic.

  • Answer 1/12

    If your child has a really bad cold, he needs an antibiotic.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    The common cold, no matter how bad, is caused by a virus. Antibiotics only fight bacteria, so they're no help. The flu, most sore throats, and many sinus and ear infections are viral, so don't expect your doc to whip out the prescription pad. That said, some infections, such as strep throat, are bacterial. For those, your child will need antibiotics. 

     

    It never hurts to ask the pediatrician, especially if your little one is feeling lousy or her cold is dragging on longer than usual.

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Sources | Reviewed by Dan Brennan, MD on November 13, 2017 Medically Reviewed on November 13, 2017

Reviewed by Dan Brennan, MD on
November 13, 2017

IMAGE PROVIDED BY:

1) Thinkstock

 

SOURCES:

American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry: "Frequently Asked Questions," "Get it Done in Year One."

CDC:"Antibiotics Aren't Always the Answer," "Head Lice," "How Much Physical Activity Do Children Need?" "Human Papillomavirus," "Recommended Immunization Schedule for Persons Aged 0 Through 18 Years."

FamilyDoctor.org (American Academy of Family Physicians): "The Basics of Braces," "Fevers in Infants and Children," "For Parents: What to Expect When Your Child Goes Through Puberty," "OTC Cough and Cold Medicine and My Child."

HealthyChildren.org (American Academy of Pediatrics): "Car Seats: Information for Families for 2015," "Head Lice: What Parents Need to Know," "Growing Pains are Normal Most of the Time," "Vitamins for Breastfed Babies."

KidsHealth.org: "All About Menstruation," "Growing Pains."

National Sleep Foundation: "National Sleep Foundation Recommends New Sleep Times."

Texas Department of State Health Services: "Head Lice Fact Sheet No. 5: Myths, Misconceptions, and Truths About Head Lice."

FDA: "OTC Cough and Cold Products: Not for Infants and Children Under 2 Years of Age."

This tool does not provide medical advice.
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THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.