0 0
  • Question 1/5

    Some vegetables are healthier for your child than others.

  • Answer 1/5

    Some vegetables are healthier for your child than others.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    There's no such thing as a bad vegetable. But some have more vitamins and minerals. When packing your child's lunch, pick bright-colored veggies such as peppers, cherry tomatoes, broccoli, and carrots; they have more nutrients than cucumbers and celery. A healthy lunch is in the bag if you also add a protein, a fruit, and a whole grain. Send the whole fruit -- an apple rather than apple sauce -- so your child gets the extra vitamins from the peel. If your child buys lunch or snacks at school, teach him to make healthier choices. School lunches now have less salt and fat and more vegetables, fruits, and whole grains.

  • Question 1/5

    Which food is a good source of calcium for your child

  • Answer 1/5

    Which food is a good source of calcium for your child

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    When you think about calcium, you probably think about dairy: milk, cheese, and yogurt. But don't worry too much if your child isn't a milk drinker. Almonds, red and white beans, and orange juice with calcium are also good sources. Kids need calcium to build strong bones and teeth, but most kids 9 to 18 don't get enough; that's because many kids drink more soda than milk. Talk to your doctor about a supplement if you're worried. Your child also needs enough vitamin D -- found in oily fish, cheese, and egg yolks -- to absorb calcium.

  • Question 1/5

    Which breakfast will give your child the most energy?

  • Answer 1/5

    Which breakfast will give your child the most energy?

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    It's fine to give your child whole-grain cereal, low fat milk, and fruit for breakfast, especially if you're in a hurry. But omelets and other foods with protein will keep your child's energy level up longer. Eggs aren't the only good protein source for the mornings; try offering whole-grain bagels or waffles with peanut butter and fruit, or a breakfast smoothie with yogurt, fruit, and a teaspoon of bran.

  • Question 1/5

    How can you make sure your child gets enough iron?

  • Answer 1/5

    How can you make sure your child gets enough iron?

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Your child needs iron to make enough red blood cells and give tissues and organs oxygen. Kids need different amounts as they grow. Red meat, tuna, salmon, eggs, and dried fruits all have a lot of iron. Serve them with foods that have vitamin C, such as broccoli, tomatoes, oranges, and strawberries; this helps the body absorb iron. Also, limit your child's milk to two to three glasses a day (16 to 24 ounces); milk makes it harder to absorb iron.

  • Question 1/5

    If my kid is a picky eater, should I worry that he's not getting all the vitamins he needs?

  • Answer 1/5

    If my kid is a picky eater, should I worry that he's not getting all the vitamins he needs?

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Most parents have heard their kid declare, "I'm full," despite a barely touched plate. But you'd be surprised at the small amount of food your child needs to get enough vitamins and minerals. So unless this happens every day, he's probably OK. But for kids who just won't eat, or who eat just a few things, you may want to consider a daily multivitamin. Always talk to your pediatrician before you give your child any vitamin or supplement.

  • Your Score:

    Share your score:
    0
    Share your score:
    Your Score:

    You correctly answered out of questions.

    Results:

    Great job! You know your child's vitamin needs from A to Z!

    Results:

    Well done. You know how to spell out a healthy diet for your child!

    Results:

    Oh dear. Study up and take the quiz again for a healthier result.

Sources | Reviewed by Amita Shroff, MD on August 29, 2017 Medically Reviewed on August 29, 2017

Reviewed by Amita Shroff, MD on
August 29, 2017

IMAGE PROVIDED BY:

Getty Images

SOURCES:

Cleveland Clinic: “Ask an expert: How can I pack a healthier lunch for my kids?”
Center for Science in the Public Interest: “The Healthy, Hungry-Free Kids Act of 2010.”
Eatright.org: “Kids heading back to classes? School lunches get a makeover.”
Healthychildren.org: “A Vitamin a Day,” “Calcium and your child,” “Kicking up the calcium,” “Vitamin Supplements and Children.”
Kidshealth.org: “Breakfast Basics,” “Iron and Your Child.”
Office of Dietary Supplements, NIH: “Calcium Quick Facts.”
Yale Medical Group: “Kids Need Their Vitamins.”

This tool does not provide medical advice.
See additional information.

THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.