PREVIOUS QUESTION:

 

NEXT QUESTION:

 

What is rotavirus?

ANSWER

Rotavirus gets its name from the fact that, under a microscope, the virus resembles a wheel. And you could say, like you might say about a wheel, rotavirus goes round and round. This nasty, potentially lethal bug causes severe diarrhea and vomiting, primarily in infants and young children. Fortunately, there are two rotavirus vaccines that can protect children from this disease.

From: Rotavirus (RV) Vaccine WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

Shui, I.M. , 2012. Journal of the American Medical Association

Tamara R. Kuittinen, MD, director, medical education, department of emergency medicine, Lenox-Hill Hospital, New York.

PATH Rotavirus Vaccine Program: "New studies show rotavirus vaccines have led to dramatic reduction in US severe rotavirus disease."

WebMD Health News: "Rotavirus Vaccine a Success Story."

Kidshealth.org: "Infections: Rotavirus."

CDC: "Rotavirus Vaccination."

CDC: "About Rotavirus."

New England Journal of Medicine web site.

Reviewed by Dan Brennan on May 08, 2018

SOURCES:

Shui, I.M. , 2012. Journal of the American Medical Association

Tamara R. Kuittinen, MD, director, medical education, department of emergency medicine, Lenox-Hill Hospital, New York.

PATH Rotavirus Vaccine Program: "New studies show rotavirus vaccines have led to dramatic reduction in US severe rotavirus disease."

WebMD Health News: "Rotavirus Vaccine a Success Story."

Kidshealth.org: "Infections: Rotavirus."

CDC: "Rotavirus Vaccination."

CDC: "About Rotavirus."

New England Journal of Medicine web site.

Reviewed by Dan Brennan on May 08, 2018

NEXT QUESTION:

How is rotavirus spread?

WAS THIS ANSWER HELPFUL

THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

    This tool does not provide medical advice. See additional information.

    Other Answers On: