PREVIOUS QUESTION:

 

NEXT QUESTION:

 

What is the difference between DTaP and Tdap vaccines?

ANSWER

Both vaccines contain inactivated forms of the toxin produced by the bacteria that cause the three diseases. Inactivated means the substance no longer produces disease, but does trigger the body to create antibodies that give it immunity against the toxins. DTaP is approved for children under age 7. Tdap, which has a reduced dose of the diphtheria and pertussis vaccines, is approved for adolescents starting at age 11 and adults ages 19 to 64. It is often called a booster dose because it boosts the immunity that wanes from vaccines given at ages 4 to 6.

Immunity wears off over time. So, the current recommendation is that everyone needs a booster shot for tetanus and diphtheria every 10 years after first being immunized. That booster comes in the form of a vaccine called Td, but since immunity to pertussis also wears off during childhood, a weaker form of the pertussis vaccine has been added to the booster to make the vaccine Tdap. The current recommendation is that one dose of the Tdap vaccine be substituted for one dose of the Td vaccine between the ages of 11 and 64. Pregnant women are also advised to get the Tdap vaccine, preferably between 27 and 36 weeks' gestation.

Children ages 7 through 10 who aren't fully vaccinated against pertussis, including children never vaccinated or with an unknown vaccination status, should get a single dose of the Tdap vaccine. Teens ages 13 through 18 who haven't gotten the Tdap vaccine yet should get a dose, followed by a booster of tetanus and diphtheria (Td) every 10 years.

From: DTaP and Tdap Vaccines WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES: , published online Feb. 1, 2011.

Pediatrics

The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia: "A Look at Each Vaccine: Diphtheria, Tetanus, and Pertussis Vaccines."

Immunization Action Coalition: "Ask the Expert: Diphtheria, Tetanus, Pertussis."

CDC: "Vaccines and Preventable Diseases: Diphtheria Vaccination;" "Diphtheria Tetanus & Pertussis Vaccines: What You Need to Know;" "How Vaccines Prevent Disease;""Common Questions Parents Ask about Infant Immunization;" and Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices.

Reviewed by Dan Brennan on April 18, 2019

SOURCES: , published online Feb. 1, 2011.

Pediatrics

The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia: "A Look at Each Vaccine: Diphtheria, Tetanus, and Pertussis Vaccines."

Immunization Action Coalition: "Ask the Expert: Diphtheria, Tetanus, Pertussis."

CDC: "Vaccines and Preventable Diseases: Diphtheria Vaccination;" "Diphtheria Tetanus & Pertussis Vaccines: What You Need to Know;" "How Vaccines Prevent Disease;""Common Questions Parents Ask about Infant Immunization;" and Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices.

Reviewed by Dan Brennan on April 18, 2019

NEXT QUESTION:

When should children be vaccinated with the DTaP vaccine?

WAS THIS ANSWER HELPFUL

THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

    This tool does not provide medical advice. See additional information.

    Other Answers On: