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What vaccines are advised for children at birth through 6 years?

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  • Hepatitis B - Three doses in the first 18 months of life.
  • Rotavirus – Two or 3 oral doses between ages 2-6 months.
  • Diphtheria, tetanus, and pertussis – The five doses start at 2 months through age 6.
  • Haemophilus influenzae type b - Kids get it three or four times starting at 2 months.
  • Pneumococcal vaccine – It comes in four doses, starting at 2 months.
  • Inactivated poliovirus vaccine – The four doses start at 2 months.
  • Measles, mumps, rubella – One dose at 12-15 months and another at 4-6 years.
  • Hepatitis A - Two doses of the vaccine starting at age 1.
  • Varicella (chickenpox) - The first dose is usually given at 12-15 months. The second is usually given at 4 to 6 years of age.
  • Influenza (flu) - Everyone 6 months of age and older should get this vaccine every year before the start of flu season.

From: Children’s Vaccines: The Basics WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES: 

Centers for Disease Control: "How Vaccines Work," "Recommended Immunizations for Children from Birth Through 6 Years Old," "2015 Recommended Immunizations for Children from 7 Through 18 Years Old."

American Academy of Pediatrics website: "Who Should Not Be Immunize," "AAP Immunizations Frequently Asked Questions: Vaccine Safety." 

DeStefano, F.  2013. The Journal of Pediatrics,

Drutz, J. UpToDate.

Reviewed by Renee A. Alli on September 08, 2017

SOURCES: 

Centers for Disease Control: "How Vaccines Work," "Recommended Immunizations for Children from Birth Through 6 Years Old," "2015 Recommended Immunizations for Children from 7 Through 18 Years Old."

American Academy of Pediatrics website: "Who Should Not Be Immunize," "AAP Immunizations Frequently Asked Questions: Vaccine Safety." 

DeStefano, F.  2013. The Journal of Pediatrics,

Drutz, J. UpToDate.

Reviewed by Renee A. Alli on September 08, 2017

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What vaccines are advised for children at age 7 through 18 years old?

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