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Who should get the meningococcal vaccine?

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Preteens who are 11 and 12 usually have the shot at their 11- or 12-year-old checkup. An appointment should be made to get the shot for teenagers who did not have it when they were 11 or 12. The vaccine may be given to pregnant women. However, since MCV4 and MenB are newer vaccines, there is limited data about their effect on pregnant women. They should only be used if clearly needed. Anyone who is allergic to any component used in the vaccine should not get the vaccine. It's important to tell your doctor about all your allergies. People with mild illness such as a cold or congestion can usually get the vaccine. But people who are moderately or severely ill at the time of vaccine administration should wait until they recover. Anyone with a history of Guillain-Barre syndrome should discuss their history with their doctor before getting a vaccination.

From: Meningococcal Vaccine WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

Pediatrics , published online Feb. 1, 2011. CDC web site: "Meningitis Questions & Answers,"  "Meningococcal Vaccines: What You Need to Know," "Meningococcal Vaccination," "Vaccines and Preventable Diseases: Meningococcal: Who Needs to Be Vaccinated?" "Meningococcal vaccine side-effects," "GBS and Menactra Meningococcal Vaccine."

VaccineInformation.org: "Meningococcal Disease Vaccine."

Reviewed by Amita Shroff on October 26, 2017

SOURCES:

Pediatrics , published online Feb. 1, 2011. CDC web site: "Meningitis Questions & Answers,"  "Meningococcal Vaccines: What You Need to Know," "Meningococcal Vaccination," "Vaccines and Preventable Diseases: Meningococcal: Who Needs to Be Vaccinated?" "Meningococcal vaccine side-effects," "GBS and Menactra Meningococcal Vaccine."

VaccineInformation.org: "Meningococcal Disease Vaccine."

Reviewed by Amita Shroff on October 26, 2017

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What are the side effects from the meningococcal vaccines?

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