PREVIOUS QUESTION:

 

NEXT QUESTION:

 

Why is getting a meningococcal vaccine important for teens?

ANSWER

Meningococcal disease can become life threatening quickly, and teens are at higher risk of getting it. It's a leading cause of bacterial meningitis in teens. Meningitis is a dangerous inflammation of the lining of the brain and spinal cord. Two meningitis vaccines protects against four types of meningococcal disease. An additional type of vaccine protects against serotype B, which also causes meningitis.

SOURCES:

Pediatrics , published online Feb. 1, 2011.

National Meningitis Association: "About Meningococcal Disease."

CDC: "Meningococcal Vaccines: What You Need to Know," "Meningococcal Vaccination."

National Network for Immunization Information: "Important Facts for Parents to Know About the Meningococcal Vaccine." 

National Network for Immunization Information: "Vaccine Information: Meningococcal Disease," "Frequently Asked Questions about the Meningococcal Vaccine."

Reviewed by Renee A. Alli on August 11, 2017

SOURCES:

Pediatrics , published online Feb. 1, 2011.

National Meningitis Association: "About Meningococcal Disease."

CDC: "Meningococcal Vaccines: What You Need to Know," "Meningococcal Vaccination."

National Network for Immunization Information: "Important Facts for Parents to Know About the Meningococcal Vaccine." 

National Network for Immunization Information: "Vaccine Information: Meningococcal Disease," "Frequently Asked Questions about the Meningococcal Vaccine."

Reviewed by Renee A. Alli on August 11, 2017

NEXT QUESTION:

Why do teens need a meningococcal vaccine?

WAS THIS ANSWER HELPFUL

THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

    This tool does not provide medical advice. See additional information.

    Other Answers On: