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Why should you vaccinate kids against diseases that are rare today?

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Few parents today have seen a case of the measles, diphtheria, whooping cough, or other diseases we vaccinate against.

This leads some to ask, "Why does my child need a vaccine against a disease that doesn't even exist?"

The answer: It's the vaccines that keep these diseases so rare. Avoiding having your child immunized because of myths about vaccine safety puts your child -- and the public -- at risk. In communities where vaccine rates have dropped, these infectious diseases have quickly returned.

From: Immunizations and Vaccines WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:  CDC. National Immunization Program, CDC.

Reviewed by Smitha Bhandari on May 20, 2018

SOURCES:  CDC. National Immunization Program, CDC.

Reviewed by Smitha Bhandari on May 20, 2018

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How do vaccines cause autism?

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