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What are triglycerides?

ANSWER

They are important to life and are the main form of fat – they are sometimes called “lipids” -- in the body. When you think of fat developing and being stored in your hips or belly, you're thinking of triglycerides. They are the end product of digesting and breaking down fats in food. Some are made in the body from other energy sources, such as carbohydrates. When you’re between meals and need more energy, your body’s hormones release them so you tap those unused calories.

From: How to Lower Your Triglycerides WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

American Heart Association: "Triglycerides,” "Women, Heart Disease and Stroke."

Mayo Clinic, “Triglycerides: Why do they matter?”

American College of Cardiology, “High Triglycerides.”

Sarwar, N. 2007. Circulation,

Third report of the National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) Expert Panel on detection, evaluation, and treatment of high blood cholesterol in adults (Adult Treatment Panel III). 2002. Circulation,

AstraZeneca.

Reviewed by Suzanne R. Steinbaum on November 14, 2018

WAS THIS ANSWER HELPFUL

SOURCES:

American Heart Association: "Triglycerides,” "Women, Heart Disease and Stroke."

Mayo Clinic, “Triglycerides: Why do they matter?”

American College of Cardiology, “High Triglycerides.”

Sarwar, N. 2007. Circulation,

Third report of the National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) Expert Panel on detection, evaluation, and treatment of high blood cholesterol in adults (Adult Treatment Panel III). 2002. Circulation,

AstraZeneca.

Reviewed by Suzanne R. Steinbaum on November 14, 2018

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