PREVIOUS QUESTION:

 

NEXT QUESTION:

 

Is it OK to take supplements for cholesterol or triglycerides?

ANSWER

Check with your doctor first. Keep a medicine diary so you can show your doctor and pharmacist what you’re taking. Or just bring all the meds and supplements you take with you to your next appointment.

Supplements are just one part of your total care plan. They’re called that for a reason. If you take them, it should only be as part of a larger effort to lower cholesterol and triglycerides. A healthy diet, regular exercise, weight loss, and meds, if your doctor prescribes them, should also be part of your plan.

SOURCES:

Anderson J. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, June 200.

Permanente Medical Group: "Psyllium: Lower Your Cholesterol."

American Heart Association: "Fish and Omega-3 Fatty Acids.”

University of Wisconsin Health: “High Cholesterol: Eating Fish and Fish Oil.”

He, J. Circulation, publishedonline July 18, 2011.

National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine: “Garlic.”

University of Maryland Medical Center: “Omega-3 Fatty Acids,” Coenzyme-Q10,” “Red Yeast Rice.”

University of Rochester Medical Center: “Know About Niacin.”

NIH News: “NIH Stops Clinical Trial on Combination Cholesterol Treatment.”

Ponda, M. Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology, published online Sept. 4, 2012.

USC Norris Cancer Hospital: “Natural and Alternative Treatment Study Report: Policosanol for High Cholesterol? Maybe Not.”  

American Heart Association: “Drug Therapy for Cholesterol.”

National Institutes of Health: “National Cholesterol Education Program Expert Panel on Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Cholesterol in Adults (Adult Treatment Panel III) - Final Report.”

The Lancet: “FDA Bans Red Yeast Rice Product.”

USDA Center for Nutrition Policy and Promotion: “Executive Summary - Dietary Guidelines for Americans, 2010.”

Oregon State University Linus Pauling Institute -- Micronutrient Research for Optimum Health: “Coenzyme Q10.”

Reviewed by Melinda Ratini on June 03, 2019

SOURCES:

Anderson J. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, June 200.

Permanente Medical Group: "Psyllium: Lower Your Cholesterol."

American Heart Association: "Fish and Omega-3 Fatty Acids.”

University of Wisconsin Health: “High Cholesterol: Eating Fish and Fish Oil.”

He, J. Circulation, publishedonline July 18, 2011.

National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine: “Garlic.”

University of Maryland Medical Center: “Omega-3 Fatty Acids,” Coenzyme-Q10,” “Red Yeast Rice.”

University of Rochester Medical Center: “Know About Niacin.”

NIH News: “NIH Stops Clinical Trial on Combination Cholesterol Treatment.”

Ponda, M. Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology, published online Sept. 4, 2012.

USC Norris Cancer Hospital: “Natural and Alternative Treatment Study Report: Policosanol for High Cholesterol? Maybe Not.”  

American Heart Association: “Drug Therapy for Cholesterol.”

National Institutes of Health: “National Cholesterol Education Program Expert Panel on Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Cholesterol in Adults (Adult Treatment Panel III) - Final Report.”

The Lancet: “FDA Bans Red Yeast Rice Product.”

USDA Center for Nutrition Policy and Promotion: “Executive Summary - Dietary Guidelines for Americans, 2010.”

Oregon State University Linus Pauling Institute -- Micronutrient Research for Optimum Health: “Coenzyme Q10.”

Reviewed by Melinda Ratini on June 03, 2019

NEXT QUESTION:

What is borderline high cholesterol?

WAS THIS ANSWER HELPFUL

"ALEXA, ASK WEBMD"

THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

    This tool does not provide medical advice. See additional information.