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How can you find out if you have chronic fatigue syndrome?

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The National Academy of Medicine has issued guidelines describing the combination of symptoms necessary for doctors to diagnose the condition. Unfortunately, there is not yet a diagnostic test that is sufficiently accurate to be useful.

Because extreme fatigue is a symptom of so many conditions, your doctor will want to rule out other conditions first, before considering a diagnosis of chronic fatigue syndrome. You’ll need to get a complete checkup and talk with your doctor about all your symptoms.

From: What is Chronic Fatigue Syndrome? WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

CDC: “Chronic Fatigue Syndrome.”

Office of Women’s Health, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services: “Chronic fatigue syndrome.”

National Health Service (U.K.): “Chronic fatigue syndrome.”

Narita, M. , November 2003. Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications

Sharpe, M. , July 1997. BMJ

Cleare, A. , April 2001. The American Journal of Psychiatry

Genetics Home Reference: “Corticosteroid-binding globulin deficiency.”

Reviewed by Anthony L Komaroff on October 12, 2018

SOURCES:

CDC: “Chronic Fatigue Syndrome.”

Office of Women’s Health, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services: “Chronic fatigue syndrome.”

National Health Service (U.K.): “Chronic fatigue syndrome.”

Narita, M. , November 2003. Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications

Sharpe, M. , July 1997. BMJ

Cleare, A. , April 2001. The American Journal of Psychiatry

Genetics Home Reference: “Corticosteroid-binding globulin deficiency.”

Reviewed by Anthony L Komaroff on October 12, 2018

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What is chronic fatigue syndrome?

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THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

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