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How can you increase your level of exercise if you have chronic fatigue syndrome?

ANSWER

As the exercise becomes manageable, gradually increase the time you do it. Aim for an increase of about 1 to 5 minutes per week. But continue to get 3 minutes of rest for every minute of exercise. If you reach a point where your exercise routine causes your symptoms to get worse, drop back down to the last level of exercise you could tolerate.

SOURCES:

CDC: “Chronic fatigue syndrome.”

The Association of UK Dietitians: “Food Fact Sheet: Chronic Fatigue Syndrome.”

National Health Service (U.K.): “Chronic fatigue syndrome.”

Disability.gov: “Accommodation ideas for employees with chronic fatigue syndrome.”

Social Security Administration: “Providing Medical Evidence to The Social Security Administration for Individuals with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome – Fact Sheet.”

Office on Women’s Health: “An Interview with a Woman Living with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: Lindsey McGrath.”

CDC: “Depression.”

Reviewed by Minesh Khatri on August 15, 2018

SOURCES:

CDC: “Chronic fatigue syndrome.”

The Association of UK Dietitians: “Food Fact Sheet: Chronic Fatigue Syndrome.”

National Health Service (U.K.): “Chronic fatigue syndrome.”

Disability.gov: “Accommodation ideas for employees with chronic fatigue syndrome.”

Social Security Administration: “Providing Medical Evidence to The Social Security Administration for Individuals with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome – Fact Sheet.”

Office on Women’s Health: “An Interview with a Woman Living with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: Lindsey McGrath.”

CDC: “Depression.”

Reviewed by Minesh Khatri on August 15, 2018

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Can a physical therapist help if you have chronic fatigue syndrome?

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