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How do I prevent water getting in my ears?

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To stop moisture from building up in your ears, try these tips.

  • Remove earbuds if you’re sweaty.
  • Coat a cotton ball with petroleum jelly and slip it into your outer ears during a bath.
  • Block your ears with cotton balls when you use hair spray or hair dye.
  • Use earplugs and a swim cap when you go in the water.
  • Have your doctor remove earwax if you think you have a problem with wax buildup. Yes, it protects your ears, but too much can trap water in the canal. Always check with your doctor. Never try to get it out yourself.

From: How to Get Water Out of Your Ears WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

Mayo Clinic: Swimmer’s Ear: Overview,” “Swimmer’s Ear: Self-management,” “Swimmer’s Ear: Symptoms and Causes,” “Swimmer’s Ear: Treatment.”

American Academy of Otolaryngology -- Head and Neck Surgery: “Swimmer's Ear.”

Nemours KidsHealth: “Infections: Swimmer’s Ear.”

American Speech-Language-Hearing Association: “Swimmer's Ear (Otitis Externa).”

Cleveland Clinic: “How to Keep Swimmer’s Ear From Ruining Your Summer.”

Children’s Hospital St. Louis: “Swimmer’s Ear vs. Ear Infection: What’s the Difference?

Reviewed by Hansa D. Bhargava on September 20, 2017

SOURCES:

Mayo Clinic: Swimmer’s Ear: Overview,” “Swimmer’s Ear: Self-management,” “Swimmer’s Ear: Symptoms and Causes,” “Swimmer’s Ear: Treatment.”

American Academy of Otolaryngology -- Head and Neck Surgery: “Swimmer's Ear.”

Nemours KidsHealth: “Infections: Swimmer’s Ear.”

American Speech-Language-Hearing Association: “Swimmer's Ear (Otitis Externa).”

Cleveland Clinic: “How to Keep Swimmer’s Ear From Ruining Your Summer.”

Children’s Hospital St. Louis: “Swimmer’s Ear vs. Ear Infection: What’s the Difference?

Reviewed by Hansa D. Bhargava on September 20, 2017

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What should you know about itchy ears?

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