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What can you do after swimming to prevent swimmer's ear?

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Tips to prevent swimmer's ear after swimming:

  • Shake or drain water from your ears. Just tilt your head and let gravity do its thing. Pulling your earlobe at different angles can also help.
  • Dry your ears. Use a clean towel to gently rub the outside of your ear. You can also use a hair dryer. Just make sure to set it on low and hold it about 12 inches away from your ear.
  • Use eardrops. You can buy over-the-counter eardrops that will help dry up any leftover water. You can also make eardrops at home. Just mix a half-teaspoon of white vinegar and a half-teaspoon of rubbing alcohol and pour it into each ear. Then let it drain out. Don't put eardrops in your ear if you have had any ear pain, ear surgery, or have a tear in your eardrum (perforated eardrum).

From: How Can I Prevent Swimmer's Ear? WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

Massachusetts Eye and Ear: "Swimmer's Ear: How to Avoid this Common Problem."

Mayo Clinic: "Swimmer's Ear."

UpToDate: "External Otitis (Including Swimmer's Ear) (Beyond the Basics)," "External Otitis: Pathogenesis, Clinical Features, and Diagnosis."

American Academy of Otolaryngology: "Swimmer's Ear."

CDC: "Facts About 'Swimmer's Ear."

Reviewed by Nayana Ambardekar on April 2, 2019

SOURCES:

Massachusetts Eye and Ear: "Swimmer's Ear: How to Avoid this Common Problem."

Mayo Clinic: "Swimmer's Ear."

UpToDate: "External Otitis (Including Swimmer's Ear) (Beyond the Basics)," "External Otitis: Pathogenesis, Clinical Features, and Diagnosis."

American Academy of Otolaryngology: "Swimmer's Ear."

CDC: "Facts About 'Swimmer's Ear."

Reviewed by Nayana Ambardekar on April 2, 2019

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