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What causes relapsing polychondritis?

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Doctors don’t know what causes relapsing polychondritis. Some think a certain gene may make you more likely to get it, but it doesn’t run in families. Researchers think some cases might be triggered by stress or things in the environment.

SOURCES:

National Institutes of Health, National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center: “Relapsing polychondritis.”

National Organization for Rare Disorders: “Relapsing Polychondritis.”

Relapsing Polychondritis Awareness and Support Foundation: “Collaboration Announcement,” “Frequently Asked Questions,” “Relapsing Polychondritis,” “What Happens to Patients with Relapsing Polychondritis?”

Up to Date: “Clinical manifestations of relapsing polychondritis,” “Treatment of relapsing polychondritis.”

Reviewed by Lisa Bernstein on December 26, 2016

SOURCES:

National Institutes of Health, National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center: “Relapsing polychondritis.”

National Organization for Rare Disorders: “Relapsing Polychondritis.”

Relapsing Polychondritis Awareness and Support Foundation: “Collaboration Announcement,” “Frequently Asked Questions,” “Relapsing Polychondritis,” “What Happens to Patients with Relapsing Polychondritis?”

Up to Date: “Clinical manifestations of relapsing polychondritis,” “Treatment of relapsing polychondritis.”

Reviewed by Lisa Bernstein on December 26, 2016

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What part of the body is affected by relapsing polychondritis?

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