PREVIOUS QUESTION:

 

NEXT QUESTION:

 

What conditions do otolaryngologists treat?

ANSWER

Otolaryngologists can do surgery and treat many different medical conditions. You would see one if you have a problem involving:

Some areas of your head are treated by other kinds of doctors. For example, neurologists deal with problems with your brain or nervous system, and ophthalmologists care for your eyes and vision.

  • An ear condition, such as an infection, hearing loss, or trouble with balance
  • Nose and nasal issues like allergies, sinusitis, or growths
  • Throat problems like tonsillitis, difficulty swallowing, and voice issues
  • Sleep trouble like snoring or obstructive sleep apnea, in which your airway is narrow or blocked and it interrupts your breathing while you sleep
  • Infections or tumors (cancerous or not) of your head or neck

From: What Is an Otolaryngologist? WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

Association of American Medical Colleges: "Otolaryngology."

Columbia University Medical Center: "What Is Otolaryngology?'

American Academy of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery: "What Is An Otolaryngologist?"

Cleveland Clinic: "Laryngology."

The American Academy of Pediatrics: "What Is a Pediatric Otolaryngologist?"

American Academy of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery: "Snoring and Sleep Apnea."

Reviewed by Melinda Ratini on January 21, 2017

SOURCES:

Association of American Medical Colleges: "Otolaryngology."

Columbia University Medical Center: "What Is Otolaryngology?'

American Academy of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery: "What Is An Otolaryngologist?"

Cleveland Clinic: "Laryngology."

The American Academy of Pediatrics: "What Is a Pediatric Otolaryngologist?"

American Academy of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery: "Snoring and Sleep Apnea."

Reviewed by Melinda Ratini on January 21, 2017

NEXT QUESTION:

What education is required of otolaryngologists?

WAS THIS ANSWER HELPFUL

THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

    This tool does not provide medical advice. See additional information.