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What is swimmer's ear?

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Known to medical professionals as otitis externa, swimmer's ear is an inflammation of the ear canal. Its common name comes from the fact that it often occurs in children and young adults who swim frequently. However, any cause of dampness in the canal can lead to irritation and chafing, very similar to diaper rash in babies. An inflammation of the skin can sometimes lead to an infection that can be very painful.

From: What Is Swimmer's Ear? WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

UpToDate: "Outer Ear Infection (The Basics)," "External Otitis (Including Swimmer's Ear) (Beyond the Basics)," "External Otitis: Pathogenesis, Clinical Features, and Diagnosis," "External Otitis: Treatment," "Malignant (Necrotizing) External Otitis."

American Family Physician: "Acute Otitis Externa: An Update."

Mayo Clinic: "Swimmer's Ear."

CDC: "Facts About 'Swimmer's Ear."

Johns Hopkins Medicine: "Swimmer's Ear."

American Academy of Otolaryngology: "Swimmer's Ear."

Cleveland Clinic: "Otitis Externa (Swimmer's Ear)."

Reviewed by Carol DerSarkissian on October 14, 2019

SOURCES:

UpToDate: "Outer Ear Infection (The Basics)," "External Otitis (Including Swimmer's Ear) (Beyond the Basics)," "External Otitis: Pathogenesis, Clinical Features, and Diagnosis," "External Otitis: Treatment," "Malignant (Necrotizing) External Otitis."

American Family Physician: "Acute Otitis Externa: An Update."

Mayo Clinic: "Swimmer's Ear."

CDC: "Facts About 'Swimmer's Ear."

Johns Hopkins Medicine: "Swimmer's Ear."

American Academy of Otolaryngology: "Swimmer's Ear."

Cleveland Clinic: "Otitis Externa (Swimmer's Ear)."

Reviewed by Carol DerSarkissian on October 14, 2019

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Can you get swimmer's ear if you don't swim?

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