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What medications are available for motion sickness?

ANSWER

If you're bothered by motion sickness, talk with your doctor about:

  • Dimenhydrinate (Dramamine): This over-the-counter antihistamine, used for allergies, helps with balance, too.
  • Scopolamine (Maldemar): This prescription medication is a patch you wear behind your ear.
  • Cyclizine (Marezine, Marzine, Emoquil)
  • Meclizine (Antivert, Bonine)
  • Promethazine (Phenadoz, Phenergan, Promethegan)

From: Why Do I Get Motion Sickness? WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

National Center for Biotechnology Information: , “What the ancient Greeks and Romans knew (and did not know) about seasickness.”  Neurology

NASA.gov: “Mixed Up in Space.”

Vestibular Disorders Association: “The Human Balance System.”

National Health Service (NHS.uk): “Motion Sickness.”

Neuroscience Online : “Vestibular System: Structure and Function.”

University of Maryland Medical Center: “Motion Sickness.”

CDC: “Travelers’ Health: Motion Sickness.”

Virtual Pediatric Hospital: “Motion Sickness.”

Mayo Clinic: “Motion Sickness: First Aid.”

Better Health Channel of Victoria State Government: “Motion Sickness.”

American Journal of Physiology, Gastrointestinal and Liver Physiology: “Effects of ginger on motion sickness and gastric slow-wave dysrhythmias induced by circular vection.”

Cleveland Clinic: “What You Need to Know About Seasickness or Motion Sickness.”

Integrative Medicine: “Self-Care: Acupressure Point P6: Pericardium 6 or Nei Guan.”

MedlinePlus.gov: “Scopolamine Transdermal Patch,” “Dimenhydrinate.”

American Academy of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery: “Dizziness and Motion Sickness.”

 

Reviewed by Dan Brennan on August 27, 2016

SOURCES:

National Center for Biotechnology Information: , “What the ancient Greeks and Romans knew (and did not know) about seasickness.”  Neurology

NASA.gov: “Mixed Up in Space.”

Vestibular Disorders Association: “The Human Balance System.”

National Health Service (NHS.uk): “Motion Sickness.”

Neuroscience Online : “Vestibular System: Structure and Function.”

University of Maryland Medical Center: “Motion Sickness.”

CDC: “Travelers’ Health: Motion Sickness.”

Virtual Pediatric Hospital: “Motion Sickness.”

Mayo Clinic: “Motion Sickness: First Aid.”

Better Health Channel of Victoria State Government: “Motion Sickness.”

American Journal of Physiology, Gastrointestinal and Liver Physiology: “Effects of ginger on motion sickness and gastric slow-wave dysrhythmias induced by circular vection.”

Cleveland Clinic: “What You Need to Know About Seasickness or Motion Sickness.”

Integrative Medicine: “Self-Care: Acupressure Point P6: Pericardium 6 or Nei Guan.”

MedlinePlus.gov: “Scopolamine Transdermal Patch,” “Dimenhydrinate.”

American Academy of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery: “Dizziness and Motion Sickness.”

 

Reviewed by Dan Brennan on August 27, 2016

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Should I call my doctor about my motion sickness?

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