PREVIOUS QUESTION:

 

NEXT QUESTION:

 

Can immune system problems cause achy joints?

ANSWER

When the lining inside your joints becomes inflamed, the area around them is tender to the touch. It might also be stiff or swollen, and it can happen with more than one joint. You may notice that it's worse in the morning.

SOURCES:

University of Rochester Medical Center, “Disorders of the Immune System.”

Office on Women’s Health, US Department of Health and Human Services, “Autoimmune Diseases Fact Sheet.”

American Academy of Allergy Asthma and Immunology, “Recurrent Infections May Signal Immunodeficiencies.”

National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, “Autoimmune Diseases.”

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, “Hygiene-Related Diseases: Diarrhea.”

National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, “Vasculitis Syndromes of the Central and Peripheral Nervous Symptoms Fact Sheet.”

Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health Pathology, “Autoimmune Disease Research Center: Frequently Asked Questions.”

The Johns Hopkins Lupus Center, “Signs, Symptoms and Co-occuring Conditions.”

University of Washington Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine, “Fatigue.”

National Fibromyalgia and Chronic Pain Association, “Chronic Fatigue Syndrome.”

National Institutes of Health, “Red Itchy Rash? Get the Skinny on Dermatitis.”

World Allergy Organization, “Diagnostic Approach to the Adult With Suspected Immune Deficiency.”

University of Maryland Medical Center, “Photodermatitis.”

University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, “Guillain-Barre Syndrome (GBS.)”

University of Florida Health, “Raynaud’s Phenomenon.”

University of Michigan Health System, “Difficulty Swallowing (Dysphagia.)”

The IBS Treatment Center, “Constipation.”

National Eye Institute, “Facts About Dry Eye.”

NIH News in Health: “Dry Eyes and Mouth?” March 2012.

Review of Optometry, “When Autoimmune Disease Initiates Dry Eye.”

Lupus Research Institute, “Lupus and Your Skin.”

Arthritis Foundation, “Rheumatoid Arthritis Symptoms.”

Reviewed by Jennifer Robinson on June 14, 2020

SOURCES:

University of Rochester Medical Center, “Disorders of the Immune System.”

Office on Women’s Health, US Department of Health and Human Services, “Autoimmune Diseases Fact Sheet.”

American Academy of Allergy Asthma and Immunology, “Recurrent Infections May Signal Immunodeficiencies.”

National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, “Autoimmune Diseases.”

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, “Hygiene-Related Diseases: Diarrhea.”

National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, “Vasculitis Syndromes of the Central and Peripheral Nervous Symptoms Fact Sheet.”

Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health Pathology, “Autoimmune Disease Research Center: Frequently Asked Questions.”

The Johns Hopkins Lupus Center, “Signs, Symptoms and Co-occuring Conditions.”

University of Washington Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine, “Fatigue.”

National Fibromyalgia and Chronic Pain Association, “Chronic Fatigue Syndrome.”

National Institutes of Health, “Red Itchy Rash? Get the Skinny on Dermatitis.”

World Allergy Organization, “Diagnostic Approach to the Adult With Suspected Immune Deficiency.”

University of Maryland Medical Center, “Photodermatitis.”

University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, “Guillain-Barre Syndrome (GBS.)”

University of Florida Health, “Raynaud’s Phenomenon.”

University of Michigan Health System, “Difficulty Swallowing (Dysphagia.)”

The IBS Treatment Center, “Constipation.”

National Eye Institute, “Facts About Dry Eye.”

NIH News in Health: “Dry Eyes and Mouth?” March 2012.

Review of Optometry, “When Autoimmune Disease Initiates Dry Eye.”

Lupus Research Institute, “Lupus and Your Skin.”

Arthritis Foundation, “Rheumatoid Arthritis Symptoms.”

Reviewed by Jennifer Robinson on June 14, 2020

NEXT QUESTION:

Can immune system problems cause hair loss?

WAS THIS ANSWER HELPFUL

"ALEXA, ASK WEBMD"

THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

    This tool does not provide medical advice. See additional information.

    Other Answers On: