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Do I need to read the label on cough medicine?

ANSWER

After you choose the right medicine for you, read the label carefully, so you understand how to take it. Also, reading the label will make you aware of common side effects and potential warning signs.

SOURCES:

Norman H. Edelman, MD, chief medical officer, American Lung Association; professor of medicine, Stony Brook University Medical Center, Stony Brook, N.Y.

Donald R. Rollins, MD, associate professor, pulmonary division, National Jewish Health, Denver, Colo.

American Academy of Pediatrics: "Withdrawal of Cold Medicines: Addressing Parent Concerns."

FamilyDoctor.org: "Cough Medicine: Understanding Your OTC Options."

Schroeder, K. , October 2004. Cochrane Database of Systemic Reviews

Bosler, D. , January 2006. Chest

Medline Plus: "Guaifenesin."

PubMed Health: "Dextromethorphan."

Reviewed by Carol DerSarkissian on July 8, 2019

SOURCES:

Norman H. Edelman, MD, chief medical officer, American Lung Association; professor of medicine, Stony Brook University Medical Center, Stony Brook, N.Y.

Donald R. Rollins, MD, associate professor, pulmonary division, National Jewish Health, Denver, Colo.

American Academy of Pediatrics: "Withdrawal of Cold Medicines: Addressing Parent Concerns."

FamilyDoctor.org: "Cough Medicine: Understanding Your OTC Options."

Schroeder, K. , October 2004. Cochrane Database of Systemic Reviews

Bosler, D. , January 2006. Chest

Medline Plus: "Guaifenesin."

PubMed Health: "Dextromethorphan."

Reviewed by Carol DerSarkissian on July 8, 2019

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What happens to your airways during an asthma attack?

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THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

    This tool does not provide medical advice. See additional information.

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