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How does exercise affect white blood cell count?

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Researchers found that regular walking may lead to a higher number of white blood cells, which fight infections. In another study, researchers found that in 65-year-olds who did regular exercise, the number of T-cells -- a specific type of white blood cell -- was as high as those of people in their 30s.

SOURCES:

Medline Plus: "Exercise and Immunity."

American College of Sports Medicine: "Exercise and the Common Cold."

MedicineNet: "Exercise Restraint When Sick."

Reviewed by Nayana Ambardekar on January 21, 2020

SOURCES:

Medline Plus: "Exercise and Immunity."

American College of Sports Medicine: "Exercise and the Common Cold."

MedicineNet: "Exercise Restraint When Sick."

Reviewed by Nayana Ambardekar on January 21, 2020

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Can I still exercise if I have a cold?

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