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How does peppermint help with congestion?

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Peppermint and its main active ingredient, menthol, are natural decongestants and may even thin out the gunk in your chest. You'll find them in many chest rubs and cough drops. You can also drink peppermint tea. Buy it from the store, or make your own: Steep 1 teaspoon of dried peppermint in a cup of boiling water for 10 minutes. Drink a cup up to five times a day.

From: 5 Ways to Get Rid of a Stuffy Nose WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology: “Saline Sinus Rinse Recipe.”

American Academy of Family Medicine: “Decongestants: OTC Relief for Congestion.”

American Academy of Pediatrics: “Vapor Rub, Petrolatum, and No Treatment for Children with Nocturnal Cough and Cold Symptoms.”

Brown University Health Promotion: “Sinusitis.”

Cleveland Clinic: “Common Cold and Upper Respiratory Illness.”

Harvard Health Publications: “Sinusitis.”

Harvey R. , July 2007. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews

Merck Manuals Professional Edition: “Nasal Congestion and Rhinorrhea.”

National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine: “Effects of Drinking Hot Water, Cold Water, and Chicken Soup on Nasal Mucus Velocity and Nasal Airflow Resistance.”

Saketkhoo K. , October 1978. Chest

UCLA Center for East-West Medicine: “A Guide to Natural Ways to Alleviate Allergy and Sinusitis Symptoms.”

Reviewed by Nayana Ambardekar on October 30, 2017

SOURCES:

American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology: “Saline Sinus Rinse Recipe.”

American Academy of Family Medicine: “Decongestants: OTC Relief for Congestion.”

American Academy of Pediatrics: “Vapor Rub, Petrolatum, and No Treatment for Children with Nocturnal Cough and Cold Symptoms.”

Brown University Health Promotion: “Sinusitis.”

Cleveland Clinic: “Common Cold and Upper Respiratory Illness.”

Harvard Health Publications: “Sinusitis.”

Harvey R. , July 2007. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews

Merck Manuals Professional Edition: “Nasal Congestion and Rhinorrhea.”

National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine: “Effects of Drinking Hot Water, Cold Water, and Chicken Soup on Nasal Mucus Velocity and Nasal Airflow Resistance.”

Saketkhoo K. , October 1978. Chest

UCLA Center for East-West Medicine: “A Guide to Natural Ways to Alleviate Allergy and Sinusitis Symptoms.”

Reviewed by Nayana Ambardekar on October 30, 2017

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