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Is it safe to take vitamin C?

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In general, vitamin C won't harm you if you get it by eating food like fruits and veggies. For most people, it's also okay if you take supplements in the recommended amount.

Higher doses of vitamin C (greater than 2,000 milligrams per day) may cause kidney stones, nausea, and diarrhea.

Talk to your doctor if you're thinking of taking vitamin C pills and let him know about any other dietary supplements you use.

From: Can Vitamin C Help My Cold? WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases: "Common Cold." PubMed: "Intake of Vitamin C and Zinc and Risk of Common Cold: A Cohort Study." Mayo Clinic: "Cold Remedies: What Works, What Doesn't, What Can't Hurt." Medscape: "Vitamin C May Be Effective Against Common Cold Primarily in Special Populations." Douglas, R.  , issue 3, John Wiley & Sons Ltd., 2007. Linus Pauling Institute. UptoDate: "The common cold in adults: Treatment and prevention."






The Cochrane Collaboration

Reviewed by Nayana Ambardekar on February 6, 2019

SOURCES: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases: "Common Cold." PubMed: "Intake of Vitamin C and Zinc and Risk of Common Cold: A Cohort Study." Mayo Clinic: "Cold Remedies: What Works, What Doesn't, What Can't Hurt." Medscape: "Vitamin C May Be Effective Against Common Cold Primarily in Special Populations." Douglas, R.  , issue 3, John Wiley & Sons Ltd., 2007. Linus Pauling Institute. UptoDate: "The common cold in adults: Treatment and prevention."






The Cochrane Collaboration

Reviewed by Nayana Ambardekar on February 6, 2019

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What should you expect if your child gets a cold?

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THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

    This tool does not provide medical advice. See additional information.

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