PREVIOUS QUESTION:

 

NEXT QUESTION:

 

Should I go to the doctor if my cough isn't going away?

ANSWER

If your cough doesn't go away, it's likely due to postnasal drip -- mucus that moves from your nose into your throat. It can be treated with antihistamines. But it could also be related to asthma or GERD (gastroesophageal reflux disease). Your doctor can tell you what to do for it.

A lasting, severe cough is also the main symptom of whooping cough, a disease that's become more common in many parts of the U.S. So, if you've been hacking away for more than two to three weeks, your doctor may give you a test to see if you've got it.

SOURCES:

CDC. “Pertussis (Whooping Cough).”

National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases: "Common Cold."

Reviewed by Carol DerSarkissian on November 9, 2020

SOURCES:

CDC. “Pertussis (Whooping Cough).”

National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases: "Common Cold."

Reviewed by Carol DerSarkissian on November 9, 2020

NEXT QUESTION:

What can I eat if I have the flu?

WAS THIS ANSWER HELPFUL

"ALEXA, ASK WEBMD"

THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

    This tool does not provide medical advice. See additional information.

    Other Answers On: