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  • Question 1/12

    Telling a fib can make your nose warmer. 

  • Answer 1/12

    Telling a fib can make your nose warmer. 

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    • Correct Answer:

    Spanish scientists say there’s truth to what they’re calling the “Pinocchio effect.” But it’s not just your nose; the area around your eyes may get warmer, too. Researchers at the University of Granada say we feel anxious when tell a lie, and that’s what causes the temperature change.

  • Question 1/12

    You lose most of your body heat through your head.

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    You lose most of your body heat through your head.

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    Your mom was looking out for you when she made you put on a hat to go out in the cold, but a warm coat and gloves were just as important. You’ll lose heat from any part of your body that’s not covered -- but no more than 10% of it escapes through your uncovered head. Keep warm by dressing right for cold weather from head to toe.

  • Question 1/12

    Body temperature can help police officers know when someone died.

  • Answer 1/12

    Body temperature can help police officers know when someone died.

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    It’s not just the stuff of crime dramas. When someone dies, his body gives off heat until it’s the same temperature as the air around him. You can get a rough idea of how long someone has been dead if you put the palm of your hand under the person’s arms. If the body is warm, he died a few hours earlier. If it’s cold and clammy, it’s been at least 18 to 24 hours.

  • Question 1/12

    A fever can be good for you.

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    A fever can be good for you.

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    Running a temperature is no fun, but it’s how your body fights off the germs that are making you sick. When your temperature is just a few degrees above the normal 98.6, it means you’re healthy enough to battle the infection. For adults, it’s not usually something to worry about unless it's above 102 degrees. But call the pediatrician if your baby has a fever of 100.4 or higher and is younger than 6 months, or is younger than a year old and has one for more than 24 hours.

  • Question 1/12

    Which of these can change your body temperature?

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    Which of these can change your body temperature?

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    Lots of things can affect how hot or cold you feel, including the weather. But caffeine and stress -- along with dehydration, exercise, and certain problems with your thyroid gland -- can all affect your body’s thermostat, too.

  • Question 1/12

    Heatstroke happens when your body temperature goes up to:

  • Answer 1/12

    Heatstroke happens when your body temperature goes up to:

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    Your body usually dissolves sweat to stay cool, but that can be hard when it’s hot and humid.  If your body can’t keep itself cool, your temperature goes up. A person with heatstroke may not be sweating. He may have trouble breathing and have red or flushed skin. It can cause shock, brain damage, and organ failure. Call 911 right away if you think someone has heatstroke.

  • Question 1/12

    When is your temperature most likely to be dangerously low?

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    When is your temperature most likely to be dangerously low?

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    Hypothermia means “low heat,” and it can be serious. It happens when you’re in the cold and heat escapes your body faster than it can be replaced. Your temperature can get too low from cold weather, high or cold wind, dampness, or cold water. Hypothermia is common in the spring and fall because it can happen with temperatures in the 50s if it’s rainy and windy.

  • Question 1/12

    Your body’s temperature changes while you sleep.

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    Your body’s temperature changes while you sleep.

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    Your normal 98.6 F is just a starting point. Your temperature goes up 1 to 2 degrees from early morning until late afternoon and then goes down again. It’s at its lowest a couple of hours before you wake up. You probably feel most awake and alert when your temperature is going up and most sleepy when it’s on the way down.

  • Question 1/12

    The morning after a woman ovulates, her temperature:

  • Answer 1/12

    The morning after a woman ovulates, her temperature:

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    After an ovary releases an egg, your temperature is a bit higher when you first wake up than during other times of the month. You’ll need a special thermometer -- called a basal thermometer -- and be sure to track your temp every day for a few months so you can see a pattern.

  • Question 1/12

    Your temperature drops as you age.

  • Answer 1/12

    Your temperature drops as you age.

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    • Correct Answer:

    Always cold? It might have something to do with your age. With seniors, the normal body temperature usually drops below 98.6. That can make it harder for people to figure out when they have a fever. 

  • Question 1/12

    Drink water before you put a thermometer in your mouth.

  • Answer 1/12

    Drink water before you put a thermometer in your mouth.

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    • Correct Answer:

    Don’t eat or drink anything for at least 5 minutes beforehand: Hot or cold food or drink can affect the reading. It’s a good idea to keep your mouth closed as well. Wash your hands with warm water and soap first; be sure to rinse the thermometer in cold water, clean it with rubbing alcohol, and rinse it off.

  • Question 1/12

    It’s OK to use a glass thermometer with mercury.

  • Answer 1/12

    It’s OK to use a glass thermometer with mercury.

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    Glass thermometers can break, and mercury is poisonous. If you have a mercury thermometer, you should get rid of it. Call your local fire or health department to find out the safest way to do that.

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Sources | Reviewed by Carol DerSarkissian on July 09, 2017 Medically Reviewed on July 09, 2017

Reviewed by Carol DerSarkissian on
July 09, 2017

1) Both images: AnitaVDB / Thinkstock

American Academy of Family Physicians: “Heat Exhaustion and Heat Stroke.”

Cleveland Clinic: “Fever,” “How to Use a Thermometer to Take Your Temperature,” “Vital Signs.”

European Commission: “Liar, Liar, Nose On Fire.”

Kidshealth.org: “A Kid’s Guide to Fever.”

Harvard Health Publications: “Normal Body Temperature: Rethinking the Normal Human Body Temperature.”

Law and Order Magazine: “Estimating the Time Of Death in Practical Homicide Investigations.”

National Sleep Foundation: “Does Your Body Temperature Change While You Sleep?”

Office of Population Affairs: “Fertility Awareness (Natural Family Planning): The Facts.”

Princeton University: “Cold Stress Facts.”

Rush University Medical Center: “Five Facts About Winter Health.”

University of Michigan: “What is Caffeine?”

University of Rochester Medical Center: “Vital Signs (Body Temperature, Pulse Rate, Respiration Rate, Blood Pressure).”

This tool does not provide medical advice.
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THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.