0 0
  • Question 1/10

    What is snot made of?

  • Answer 1/10

    What is snot made of?

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    You breathe in dirt, pollen, and other icky stuff. A slippery substance called mucus traps it all. Tiny hairs in your nose help move the whole glob toward your nostrils or to the back of your throat. Snot is that mix of mucus, dirt, and other stuff.

  • Question 1/10

    Your nose makes this much mucus every day:

  • Answer 1/10

    Your nose makes this much mucus every day:

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Your nose is a mucus-making machine. Every day, it churns out about 4 cups' worth. And you swallow most of it. It mixes with spit and passes down your throat without you even noticing. Sometimes the mucus gets too thick and it builds up in the back of your throat. When it runs down your throat, that's called postnasal drip.

  • Question 1/10

    What does mucus in your nose do?

  • Answer 1/10

    What does mucus in your nose do?

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Mucus shields you from stuff that could harm you. In your nose it keeps dirt, dust, and other harmful things that you breathe in from reaching your lungs. If that gunk got into your lungs, they could get infected or irritated, and you might have trouble breathing.

  • Question 1/10

    Drinking milk = more mucus.

  • Answer 1/10

    Drinking milk = more mucus.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    You don’t have to give up milk when you have a cold. It may make you feel like you have more phlegm, but studies show dairy products won't cause your body to make more mucus. That said, water, and lots of it, is the best thing when you're congested.

  • Question 1/10

    There’s mucus in your belly.

  • Answer 1/10

    There’s mucus in your belly.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    When it comes to mucus, the nose gets most of the attention. But you also have it in your stomach, intestines, mouth, and lungs. Thin layers of tissue that line the inside of your body make it. Mucus keeps things moist and helps protect you.

  • Question 1/10

    Mucus helps keep babies safe in the womb.

  • Answer 1/10

    Mucus helps keep babies safe in the womb.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    While a woman is pregnant, thick mucus forms a plug at the opening of her cervix and seals off her uterus, where the baby grows. When her body is ready for labor, the cervix opens wider and the mucus plug drops out of her body.

  • Question 1/10

    This might help with mucus in your throat. 

  • Answer 1/10

    This might help with mucus in your throat. 

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    It does more than keep your breath fresh. Menthol, the main ingredient in peppermint, may help thin mucus. It can also help with some sore throats.

  • Question 1/10

    If your snot is yellow or green, it means you're getting sick.

  • Answer 1/10

    If your snot is yellow or green, it means you're getting sick.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Usually, the mucus in your nose is clear. When you have an infection, your body sends in a bunch of white blood cells. These cells have a substance that can turn your snot yellow or green. But some of those white blood cells are always there, so you may still have green snot if you aren't sick. A blackish color may be due to dirt in your nose. Red or brownish boogers can be from broken blood vessels. A small amount of blood is usually nothing to worry about, but if it doesn't go away, call your doctor.

  • Question 1/10

    Your nose can heat up air on a cold day.

  • Answer 1/10

    Your nose can heat up air on a cold day.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    You may not like carrying tissues all winter long, but there's a good reason you need them. Your nose is doing its part to warm you. The small blood vessels in your nostrils widen to boost blood flow. This causes you to make more mucus, but it helps heat up cold air before it goes to your lungs.

  • Question 1/10

    Medication can help get rid of mucus.

  • Answer 1/10

    Medication can help get rid of mucus.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    A bad cold can make mucus build up in your lungs. Medications called expectorants make it thinner and easier to get out. Other cough medicines that do not have an expectorant won’t break up mucus. They just keep you from coughing.

  • Your Score:

    Share your score:
    0
    Share your score:
    Your Score:

    You correctly answered out of questions.

    Results:

    Great job! You have a nose for facts about mucus!

    Results:

    Not bad. A few more mucus facts should clear things up for you.

    Results:

    You blew it. Put your nose to the grindstone and learn more about mucus.

Sources | Reviewed by Melinda Ratini, MS, DO on June 17, 2017 Medically Reviewed on June 17, 2017

Reviewed by Melinda Ratini, MS, DO on
June 17, 2017

IMAGE PROVIDED BY:

  1. iStock

SOURCES:

American Academy of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery: “Post-Nasal Drip.”

Cleveland Clinic: “Labor and Delivery.”

Dairy Council of California: “Myth: Drinking Milk Causes Mucus.”

European Lung Foundation: “The normal lung.”

Kidshealth.org: “Mucus,” “Mucous Membrane,” “Pregnancy Calendar, Week 7, Your Baby’s Development,” “What’s a booger?” “Why does my nose run?”

NHS: “Five Facts About Colds.”

OTCsafety.org: “Cough Expectorants.”

Patient.co.UK: “Cough Medicines.”

Pinnock, CB. The American Review of Respiratory Disease , February 1990.

The Ohio State University: “Medical Mythbusters: Green Snot.”

University of Maryland Medical Center: “Bronchitis,” “Peppermint.”

Wisegeek.com: “Why does my nose run when it’s cold outside?”

Wüthrich, B. Journal of the American College of Nutrition, December 2005.

This tool does not provide medical advice.
See additional information.