Cold & Flu Activity

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  • Question 1/13

    What's the germiest thing in your house?

  • Answer 1/13

    What's the germiest thing in your house?

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    • Correct Answer:

    Wiping down counters and washing dishes is supposed to get things clean, right? That's true as long as you don't let that rag or sponge get too nasty. You'll end up spreading more ick that way.

     

    Sponges pick up bacteria if they're not cleaned right. Zap a wet one in the microwave for 2 minutes every day and replace it every 2 weeks. Better yet, use cloths, towels, and rags that you can toss in the washer or clean with bleach.

  • Question 1/13

    The only way to catch a cold is from germs that float in the air.

  • Answer 1/13

    The only way to catch a cold is from germs that float in the air.

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    When somebody sneezes, that's just the start of the trouble. Besides the germs in the air, you can also get sick if you put your hand on something the germs land on, like a doorknob or elevator button, and then touch your eyes, nose or mouth.

  • Question 1/13

    How fast do germs travel when you sneeze?

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    How fast do germs travel when you sneeze?

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    If you went that fast in your car you'd get a ticket! Since sneezing is legal, your best defense against flying germs is to stay at least 6 feet away from someone who's sick. You'll lower your chances of picking up their bugs.

  • Question 1/13

    Your cell phone has more germs than a toilet seat.

  • Answer 1/13

    Your cell phone has more germs than a toilet seat.

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    • Correct Answer:

    Surprise! That thing you carry around and hold up to your mouth all day has 10 times more bacteria than most toilet seats. The reason? You don't clean your phone like you clean a bathroom.

     

    Don't worry about it too much. Those are your germs on the phone, so you won't get sick as long as you don't share it.

  • Question 1/13

    When you kiss your sweetheart, how many germs do you spread?

  • Answer 1/13

    When you kiss your sweetheart, how many germs do you spread?

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    It takes just 10 seconds of locking lips to trade them with your partner. But that doesn't mean you'll get sick. If you pucker up with someone several times a day, you'll end up sharing similar germs.

  • Question 1/13

    Your pet turtle could make you sick.

  • Answer 1/13

    Your pet turtle could make you sick.

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    • Correct Answer:

    A turtle, frog, snake, or iguana can carry salmonella, a germ that makes you sick to the stomach.


    If you have any of these, wash your hands after you touch it. It's best to choose another kind of pet if you have young children. Kids put their fingers in their mouths and are more likely to get sick.

  • Question 1/13

    Chlorine keeps pools germ-free.

  • Answer 1/13

    Chlorine keeps pools germ-free.

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    Most germs die in an hour if the chemicals in the pool are at the right levels. But some can live for days. And if you swallow even a little of that water you could get sick.

     

    Do your part. Keep pee, poop, dirt, and sweat out of the water. Shower before you take a dip, and don't go in if you have diarrhea.

  • Question 1/13

    Don't have a tissue? The best place to cough or sneeze is your:

  • Answer 1/13

    Don't have a tissue? The best place to cough or sneeze is your:

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    Your upper sleeve will also do if your elbow isn't covered. But the best way to keep germs to yourself is to put a tissue over your mouth and nose. Throw it in a waste basket and wash your hands well when you’re done.

  • Question 1/13

    Germs are alive.

  • Answer 1/13

    Germs are alive.

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    They're itsy-bitsy -- way too small to see -- but these invaders are living things. They can get into plants, animals, and people, and some can make you sick.

     

    There are four main kinds of germs: bacteria, viruses, fungi, and one-celled things call protozoa that love water.

  • Question 1/13

    It's OK to eat food that falls on the floor.

  • Answer 1/13

    It's OK to eat food that falls on the floor.

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    As a kid, you may have followed the "5-second rule" that says you can pop food into your mouth if you pick it up right away. Turns out it's better not to.

     

    Germs get on food as soon as it hits the floor. It's hard to know if they'll make you sick, but why take the chance? When in doubt, toss it out.

  • Question 1/13

    Deep clean your kitchen sink at least once a week.

  • Answer 1/13

    Deep clean your kitchen sink at least once a week.

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    There's a bunch of icky stuff there. Wash it once or twice a week with a cleaner that gets rid of germs. Be sure to get the sides and the bottom.

     

    Pour a teaspoon of bleach in a quart of water. Toss it down your drain once a month to clean it and the garbage disposal. Don't forget the sink strainers. Pop them in the dishwasher every week.  

  • Question 1/13

    Antibacterial soap is the best weapon against germs.

  • Answer 1/13

    Antibacterial soap is the best weapon against germs.

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    There's nothing to show the fancy stuff does a better job than plain old soap.

     

    Choose liquid over solid, though. Germs can grow on a bar of soap.

  • Question 1/13

    How long does it take to wash your hands right?

  • Answer 1/13

    How long does it take to wash your hands right?

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    A quick rinse won't cut it if you want to get rid of germs. Use warm water and soap and rub your hands together.

     

    Need an easy way to remember how long to wash? Sing "Happy Birthday" twice and you're done.

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Sources | Reviewed by Carol DerSarkissian on July 19, 2017 Medically Reviewed on July 19, 2017

Reviewed by Carol DerSarkissian on
July 19, 2017

IMAGE PROVIDED BY:
1) Getty Images

SOURCES:

American Dental Association: "Learn More About Toothbrushes."

BioMed Central: "80 Million Bacteria Sealed with a Kiss."

CDC: "An Ounce of Prevention Keeps the Germs Away," "Cover Your Cough," "Personal NPIs," "Recreational Water Illnesses," "Reptiles, Amphibians, and Salmonella," "Show Me the Science: When to Use Hand Sanitizers," "Steps of Healthy Swimming: Protection Against Recreational Water Illnesses (RWIs)," "Triple A's of Healthy Swimming," "Why Doesn't Chlorine Kill Recreational Water Illness (RWI) Germs?"

Kidshealth.org: "The 5-Second Rule," "What Are Germs?" "What Makes Me Sneeze?"

Ministry Health Care: "Getting the Dirt on Germs."

Minnesota Department of Health: "Which Soap is Best?"

NSF: "How to Clean the Germiest Home Items," "Kitchen is the Germiest Place in the House."

San Francisco Department of Public Health: "Germs."

The University of Arizona: "Learn About Germs," "Why Your Cell Phone Has More Germs Than a Toilet Seat."

This tool does not provide medical advice.
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