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How are blood tests used to diagnose adenocarcinoma?

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Adenocarcinoma is a type of cancer that starts in the glands that line the inside of one of your organs. Your blood may show signs of possible cancer. For example, your doctor may check it to see if you have anemia from a bleeding tumor. In addition, high levels of some enzymes or other things made by cancer cells might mean that you have adenocarcinoma.

SOURCES:

National Cancer Institute.

Maurie Markman, MD, president of medicine and science, Cancer Treatment Centers of America, Philadelphia.

Cancer Treatment Centers of America.

American Cancer Society: "What is non-small cell lung cancer?"

University of Southern California Center for Pancreatic and Biliary Diseases, Los Angeles.

Penn Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia.

Colon Cancer Coalition: "What Is Colon Cancer?"

Johns Hopkins: "Colorectal Cancer."

Esophageal Cancer Awareness Association:  "What is an Esophagus?"

Reviewed by Carol DerSarkissian on October 28, 2019

SOURCES:

National Cancer Institute.

Maurie Markman, MD, president of medicine and science, Cancer Treatment Centers of America, Philadelphia.

Cancer Treatment Centers of America.

American Cancer Society: "What is non-small cell lung cancer?"

University of Southern California Center for Pancreatic and Biliary Diseases, Los Angeles.

Penn Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia.

Colon Cancer Coalition: "What Is Colon Cancer?"

Johns Hopkins: "Colorectal Cancer."

Esophageal Cancer Awareness Association:  "What is an Esophagus?"

Reviewed by Carol DerSarkissian on October 28, 2019

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How are imaging tests used to diagnose adenocarcinoma?

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