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How are colon polyps treated?

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During a colonoscopy or flexible sigmoidoscopy, your doctor uses forceps or a wire loop to remove polyps. This is called a polypectomy. If the polyp is too large to take out this way, you may need surgery to remove it. Once it’s out, a pathologist tests it for cancer.

If you have a genetic condition like familial adenomatous polyposis, your doctor may recommend surgery to remove part or all of your colon and rectum. That’s the best way to prevent colon cancer for people with these health problems.

If you have colon polyps, there’s a good chance you’ll get more of them later on. Your doctor will recommend that you have more screening tests in the future.

SOURCES:

National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases: “Colon Polyps,” “Colonoscopy,” “Virtual Colonoscopy.”

Mayo Clinic: “Colon Cancer,” “Colon Polyps,” “Rectal Bleeding,” “Rectal Cancer.”

American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy: “Understanding Polyps and Their Treatment.”

American Cancer Society: “Understanding Your Pathology Report: Colon Polyps (Sessile or Traditional Serrated Adenomas).”

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services: “Dietary Guidelines 2015-2020.”

Reviewed by Laura J. Martin on February 05, 2018

SOURCES:

National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases: “Colon Polyps,” “Colonoscopy,” “Virtual Colonoscopy.”

Mayo Clinic: “Colon Cancer,” “Colon Polyps,” “Rectal Bleeding,” “Rectal Cancer.”

American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy: “Understanding Polyps and Their Treatment.”

American Cancer Society: “Understanding Your Pathology Report: Colon Polyps (Sessile or Traditional Serrated Adenomas).”

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services: “Dietary Guidelines 2015-2020.”

Reviewed by Laura J. Martin on February 05, 2018

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How can you prevent colon polyps?

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