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How can you avoid colorectal cancer?

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To keep this disease away, it's important to find polyps early. Since they usually don't cause symptoms, your best bet is to get a screening test that can spot them.

You've got several choices. Which one you get -- and how often -- depends on your age and what kind of risk you've got for colorectal cancer. Experts say you should get your first test at age 50, but if you've got a family history of the condition, you may need to start earlier. Check with your doctor about what's right for you.

From: How to Find Colon Polyps Early WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

American Cancer Society: "American Cancer Society recommendations for colorectal cancer early detection," "Frequently Asked Questions About Colonoscopy and Sigmoidoscopy," "Stool DNA Testing for Colon Cancer," "Colorectal cancer screening tests."

American College of Gastroenterology: "Colon Polyps."

American Society of Clinical Oncology: "Fecal Occult Blood Tests."

CDC: "Colorectal Cancer Screening Tests."

Colorectal Cancer Association of Canada: "Introduction to Fecal Occult Blood Tests."

Massachusetts General Hospital: "Double-Contrast Barium Enema (DCBE)."

National Cancer Institute: "Tests to Detect Colorectal Cancer and Polyps."

National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases: "Colonoscopy."

U.S. Preventive Services Task Force: "Final Recommendation Statement. Colorectal Cancer: Screening."

Mayo Clinic: "Fecal occult blood test."

Reviewed by Laura J. Martin on July 10, 2018

SOURCES:

American Cancer Society: "American Cancer Society recommendations for colorectal cancer early detection," "Frequently Asked Questions About Colonoscopy and Sigmoidoscopy," "Stool DNA Testing for Colon Cancer," "Colorectal cancer screening tests."

American College of Gastroenterology: "Colon Polyps."

American Society of Clinical Oncology: "Fecal Occult Blood Tests."

CDC: "Colorectal Cancer Screening Tests."

Colorectal Cancer Association of Canada: "Introduction to Fecal Occult Blood Tests."

Massachusetts General Hospital: "Double-Contrast Barium Enema (DCBE)."

National Cancer Institute: "Tests to Detect Colorectal Cancer and Polyps."

National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases: "Colonoscopy."

U.S. Preventive Services Task Force: "Final Recommendation Statement. Colorectal Cancer: Screening."

Mayo Clinic: "Fecal occult blood test."

Reviewed by Laura J. Martin on July 10, 2018

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What happens if your doctor finds colon polyps during a colonoscopy?

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