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How is surgery used to treat stage IV colorectal cancer?

ANSWER

Stage IV colorectal cancers are "metastatic," which means they have spread outside the colon to other parts of the body, such as the liver or the lungs.

You may need an operation to remove the cancer, from the colon and in other places. Or you may need surgery to bypass the cancer and hook back up the healthy parts of the colon.

Treatment may also include chemotherapy, monoclonal antibodies, targeted therapy, and radiation.

Clinical trials are studies that test new drugs or treatments to see if they are safe and if they work. They're often a way to get medicine that isn't available to everyone. Your doctor can tell you if one of these trials might be a good fit for you.

SOURCES:

American Cancer Society.

FDA.

Reviewed by Laura J. Martin on February 26, 2017

SOURCES:

American Cancer Society.

FDA.

Reviewed by Laura J. Martin on February 26, 2017

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How are clinical trials used to treat stage IV colorectal cancer?

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