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My treatment for colon cancer is over. What should my primary care doctor know?

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After cancer treatment, your oncologist will usually be your main contact. If he asks your primary care doctor to take over, be sure to give the doctor:

And bring a copy of this summary with you for all your appointments.

  • Your follow-up plan from your oncologist
  • Names and doses of your medicines
  • Specifics of your diagnosis
  • Any treatment complications
  • Dates of all surgeries
  • Dates and amounts of radiation and where it was done
  • Contact info for all of your doctors

From: Follow-up Care After Colon Cancer WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

American Cancer Society: "What happens after treatment for colorectal cancer?"

American Cancer Society: "If treatment for colorectal cancer stops working."

American Society of Clinical Oncology: "Follow-Up Care for Colorectal Cancer."

Cleveland Clinic: "Colon and Rectal Cancer."

National Comprehensive Cancer Network: "Taking Charge of Follow-Up Care."

 

Reviewed by Minesh Khatri on February 04, 2018

SOURCES:

American Cancer Society: "What happens after treatment for colorectal cancer?"

American Cancer Society: "If treatment for colorectal cancer stops working."

American Society of Clinical Oncology: "Follow-Up Care for Colorectal Cancer."

Cleveland Clinic: "Colon and Rectal Cancer."

National Comprehensive Cancer Network: "Taking Charge of Follow-Up Care."

 

Reviewed by Minesh Khatri on February 04, 2018

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My treatment for colon cancer is over. What should I know about follow-up tests?

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