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What happens if something unusual is found during a colonoscopy?

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If anything unusual is in your colon, like a polyp or inflamed tissue, the physician can remove it or a piece of it using tiny instruments passed through the scope. That tissue, known as a biopsy, is then sent to a lab for testing. If there is bleeding in the colon, the physician can use the scope to pass a laser, heater probe or electrical probe, or inject special medicines, to stop the bleeding.

From: Colonoscopy WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES: The National Digestive Diseases Information Clearinghouse of The National Institutes of Health. "Colonoscopy." NIH Publication No. 98-4331. July 7, 1998.

Reviewed by Sabrina Felson on October 22, 2018

SOURCES: The National Digestive Diseases Information Clearinghouse of The National Institutes of Health. "Colonoscopy." NIH Publication No. 98-4331. July 7, 1998.

Reviewed by Sabrina Felson on October 22, 2018

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What are possible complications of colonoscopies?

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