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What happens during a laparoscopic total abdominal colectomy?

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You’ll be asleep under general anesthesia. The surgeon will make a handful of cuts about half an inch long to put in the laparoscope (a tool with a small camera) and to work through.

They'll carefully free the colon in sections and cut and close the main blood vessels (arteries) that supply blood to it. When the entire large intestine is freed, the surgeon will free the right colon from the ileum and identify the part of the ileum to be joined with the rectum.

After they make sure that all attachments to the tissue have been cut, they'll pull the colon out of your abdomen. Then they'll join your rectum and ileum, rinse the abdominal cavity, and check the connection for leaks. Finally, they'll stitch or tape all the surgical cuts in your abdomen.

From: Laparoscopic Total Abdominal Colectomy WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

Fichera, A. , July 2011. Epub, Feb. 19, 2011. J Gastrointest Surg

Laparoscopic Surgical Center of New York. 

Reviewed by Minesh Khatri on October 25, 2017

SOURCES:

Fichera, A. , July 2011. Epub, Feb. 19, 2011. J Gastrointest Surg

Laparoscopic Surgical Center of New York. 

Reviewed by Minesh Khatri on October 25, 2017

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What is step 2 in a laparoscopic total abdominal colectomy?

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