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How can you treat postpartum depression?

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You might not want to tell anyone you feel depressed after your baby’s birth. But treatment can help you feel like yourself again, so it’s important to seek help quickly.

If you have symptoms of postpartum depression, such as feeling hopeless and trouble bonding with your baby, or if the baby blues don’t ease up after 2 weeks, get in touch with your doctor right away. Don’t wait for your 6-week checkup.

Your doctor may prescribe brexanolone (Zulresso), a new synthetic version of the hormone allopregnanolone, which has been found effective in relieving symptoms of postpartum depression. She might also suggest counseling or antidepressants e to treat your symptoms.

SOURCES:


Nemours Foundation: “Postpartum depression.”

American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists: “Postpartum Depression.”

Office on Women’s Health: “Depression during and after pregnancy fact sheet.”

National Institute of Mental Health: “Postpartum Depression Facts.”

American Academy of Pediatrics: “Depression During & After Pregnancy: You Are Not Alone.”

Reviewed by Traci C. Johnson on March 19, 2019

SOURCES:


Nemours Foundation: “Postpartum depression.”

American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists: “Postpartum Depression.”

Office on Women’s Health: “Depression during and after pregnancy fact sheet.”

National Institute of Mental Health: “Postpartum Depression Facts.”

American Academy of Pediatrics: “Depression During & After Pregnancy: You Are Not Alone.”

Reviewed by Traci C. Johnson on March 19, 2019

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Can yoga help with postpartum depression?

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