PREVIOUS QUESTION:

 

NEXT QUESTION:

 

What is postpartum depression (PPD)?

ANSWER

Postpartum depression (PPD) is a complex mix of physical, emotional, and behavioral changes that happen in a woman after giving birth. According to the DSM-5, a manual used to diagnose mental disorders, PPD is a form of major depression that has its onset within four weeks after delivery.

From: Postpartum Depression WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

National Institute of Mental Health: "What is Depression?"

National Institute of Mental Health: "Depression: What Every Woman Should Know."

MedlinePlus: "Medical Encyclopedia: Post-partum Depression."

National Institutes of Health: News in Health: "Understanding Post Partum Depression, Common but Treatable."

American Psychiatric Association. , American Psychiatric Pub, 2000. Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders: DSM-IV-TR

Fieve, R, MD. Rodale Books, 2006. Bipolar II,

The Journal of the American Medical Association. “Recommendations for Screening Depression in Adults,” Vol. 315, No. 4, January 26, 2016.

 

Reviewed by Traci C. Johnson on March 22, 2019

SOURCES:

National Institute of Mental Health: "What is Depression?"

National Institute of Mental Health: "Depression: What Every Woman Should Know."

MedlinePlus: "Medical Encyclopedia: Post-partum Depression."

National Institutes of Health: News in Health: "Understanding Post Partum Depression, Common but Treatable."

American Psychiatric Association. , American Psychiatric Pub, 2000. Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders: DSM-IV-TR

Fieve, R, MD. Rodale Books, 2006. Bipolar II,

The Journal of the American Medical Association. “Recommendations for Screening Depression in Adults,” Vol. 315, No. 4, January 26, 2016.

 

Reviewed by Traci C. Johnson on March 22, 2019

NEXT QUESTION:

What are the symptoms of postpartum depression (PPD)?

WAS THIS ANSWER HELPFUL

THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

    This tool does not provide medical advice. See additional information.