PREVIOUS QUESTION:

 

NEXT QUESTION:

 

Can depression affect my body?

ANSWER

People with depression often have physical signs like joint pain, back pain, digestive problems, sleep trouble, and appetite changes. You might have slowed speech and movements, too. The reason is that brain chemicals linked to depression, specifically serotonin and norepinephrine, play a role in both mood and pain.

From: What Is Depression? WebMD Medical Reference

Reviewed by Neha Pathak on September 21, 2017

Medically Reviewed on 09/21/2017

SOURCES:

National Institute of Mental Health: "What is Depression?" “Disruptive Mood Dysregulation Disorder.”

American Psychiatric Association. : , American Psychiatric Pub, 2000. Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders DSM-IV-TR

Fieve, R, MD. Rodale Books, 2006. Bipolar II,

The Journal of the American Medical Association : “Recommendations for Screening Depression in Adults,” Vol. 315, No. 4, January 26, 2016.

Medscape: “Substance-induced Mood Disorder.”

Mayo Clinic: “Depression (major depressive disorder).”

Massachusetts General Hospital Center for Women’s Mental Health: “PMS and PMDD.”

Reviewed by Neha Pathak on September 21, 2017

SOURCES:

National Institute of Mental Health: "What is Depression?" “Disruptive Mood Dysregulation Disorder.”

American Psychiatric Association. : , American Psychiatric Pub, 2000. Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders DSM-IV-TR

Fieve, R, MD. Rodale Books, 2006. Bipolar II,

The Journal of the American Medical Association : “Recommendations for Screening Depression in Adults,” Vol. 315, No. 4, January 26, 2016.

Medscape: “Substance-induced Mood Disorder.”

Mayo Clinic: “Depression (major depressive disorder).”

Massachusetts General Hospital Center for Women’s Mental Health: “PMS and PMDD.”

Reviewed by Neha Pathak on September 21, 2017

NEXT QUESTION:

Is childhood depression common?

WAS THIS ANSWER HELPFUL

"ALEXA, ASK WEBMD"

THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

    This tool does not provide medical advice. See additional information.

    Other Answers On: